Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5862-2
Title: Occupational exposure to endocrine disrupting substances and the risk of breast Cancer: The Singapore Chinese health study
Authors: Acheampong T.
Yuan J.-M. 
Koh W.P. 
Jin A.LL 
Odegaard A.
Keywords: endocrine disruptor
adverse event
aged
breast tumor
female
human
industry
middle aged
occupation
occupational disease
occupational exposure
pregnancy
proportional hazards model
prospective study
reproductive history
Singapore
Aged
Breast Neoplasms
Endocrine Disruptors
Female
Humans
Industry
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases
Occupational Exposure
Occupations
Pregnancy
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Reproductive History
Singapore
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Acheampong T., Yuan J.-M., Koh W.P., Jin A.LL, Odegaard A. (2018). Occupational exposure to endocrine disrupting substances and the risk of breast Cancer: The Singapore Chinese health study. BMC Public Health 18 (1) : 929. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5862-2
Abstract: Background: Evidence from basic research links exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) with a higher risk for breast cancer. However, there is less evidence from observational epidemiological research and the results are equivocal. Therefore, we examined the association between occupational exposure to substances where exposure to EDCs is likely and the risk of breast cancer. Methods: A prospective study consisting of a population-based cohort of 33,458 Singaporean Chinese women aged 45-74 years enrolled in the Singapore Chinese Health Study (SCHS) from 1993 to 98 and followed through 2014. Subjects' self-reported occupational exposure and duration to industries, job titles, and substance types were garnered at baseline, and cases of incident breast cancer (N = 988) were determined by linkage with the Singapore Cancer Registry. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated for exposure to substances, job titles, and industries. Results: There was no association between cumulative exposure to substances via occupation where EDC exposure is likely and risk of breast cancer. These results were consistent for hypothesized high (HR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.66-1.35), medium (HR 1.03 95% CI: 0.77-1.38) and low (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.48-1.13) combined substance exposure groups when compared with those who were not exposed via occupation. Similar null associations were observed when examining job titles and industry categories. Conclusions: There was no association between EDC related occupational exposures and breast cancer risk in working women of the Singaporean Chinese Health Study. Future studies that employ rigorous methods with regard to exposure assessment of EDCs are needed. © 2018 The Author(s).
Source Title: BMC Public Health
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175375
ISSN: 1471-2458
DOI: 10.1186/s12889-018-5862-2
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