Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33358-2
Title: Febrile Temperature Elevates the Expression of Phosphatidylserine on Plasmodium falciparum (FCR3CSA) Infected Red Blood Cell Surface Leading to Increased Cytoadhesion
Authors: Zhang, R 
Chandramohanadas, R
Lim, C.T 
Dao, M
Keywords: chondroitin sulfate
phosphatidylserine
animal
biosynthesis
blood
cell adhesion
CHO cell line
Cricetulus
erythrocyte
fever
genetics
human
malaria falciparum
metabolism
parasitology
pathogenicity
Plasmodium falciparum
surface property
temperature
Animals
Cell Adhesion
CHO Cells
Chondroitin Sulfates
Cricetulus
Erythrocytes
Fever
Humans
Malaria, Falciparum
Phosphatidylserines
Plasmodium falciparum
Surface Properties
Temperature
Issue Date: 2018
Citation: Zhang, R, Chandramohanadas, R, Lim, C.T, Dao, M (2018). Febrile Temperature Elevates the Expression of Phosphatidylserine on Plasmodium falciparum (FCR3CSA) Infected Red Blood Cell Surface Leading to Increased Cytoadhesion. Scientific Reports 8 (1) : 15022. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-33358-2
Abstract: During the asexual intra-erythrocytic cycle, Plasmodium (P.) falciparum exports parasitic proteins to the surface of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) facilitating its cytoadhesion to various endothelial host receptors. This adhesive behavior is a critical contributor towards disease manifestation. However, little is known about the influence of recurring elevated temperature – a common symptom of the malaria infection – on the adhesive properties of iRBCs to endothelial receptors. To address this, we performed dual-micropipette step-pressure technique between P. falciparum (strain FCR3CSA) iRBCs and Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing Chondroitin sulfate A (CHO-CSA) after transient iRBCs incubation at febrile temperatures which revealed increase in adhesion parameters. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis revealed an increase in phosphatidylserine (PS) expression on the iRBC surface following exposure to febrile temperature. The adhesion between iRBCs and CHO-CSA cells was remarkably reduced in presence of soluble Annexin V, indicating the mediation of PS on the adhesion events. Our results suggest that elevated PS recruitment on iRBC under thermally stressed conditions contributes to the increased adhesive behavior of iRBCs CSA-binding phenotype to CHO-CSA. © 2018, The Author(s).
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175015
ISSN: 20452322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-33358-2
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