Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-11147-7
Title: Moral judgment modulation by disgust priming via altered fronto-temporal functional connectivity
Authors: Lim J. 
Kurnianingsih Y.A. 
Ong H.H.
Mullette-Gillman O.A. 
Keywords: adult
brain analysis
clinical article
disgust
dorsal anterior cingulate cortex
dorsomedial prefrontal cortex
facial expression
female
functional connectivity
functional magnetic resonance imaging
human
male
modulation
morality
stimulus
temporoparietal junction
brain mapping
decision making
diagnostic imaging
nerve cell network
nuclear magnetic resonance imaging
parietal lobe
physiology
prefrontal cortex
temporal lobe
young adult
Brain Mapping
Disgust
Female
Humans
Judgment
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Morals
Nerve Net
Parietal Lobe
Prefrontal Cortex
Temporal Lobe
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Lim J., Kurnianingsih Y.A., Ong H.H., Mullette-Gillman O.A. (2017). Moral judgment modulation by disgust priming via altered fronto-temporal functional connectivity. Scientific Reports 7 (1) : 10887. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-11147-7
Abstract: Moral judgments are not just the product of conscious reasoning, but also involve the integration of social and emotional information. Irrelevant disgust stimuli modulate moral judgments, with individual sensitivity determining the direction and size of effects across both hypothetical and incentive-compatible experimental designs. We investigated the neural circuitry underlying this modulation using fMRI in 19 individuals performing a moral judgment task with subliminal priming of disgust facial expressions. Our results indicate that individual changes in moral acceptability due to priming covaried with individual differences in activation within the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). Further, whole-brain analyses identified changes in functional connectivity between the dmPFC and the temporal-parietal junction (TPJ). High sensitivity individuals showed enhanced functional connectivity between the TPJ and dmPFC, corresponding with deactivation in the dmPFC, and rating the moral dilemmas as more acceptable. Low sensitivity individuals showed the opposite pattern of results. Post-hoc, these findings replicated in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (daMCC), an adjacent region implicated in converting between objective and subjective valuation. This suggests a specific computational mechanism - that disgust stimuli modulate moral judgments by altering the integration of social information to determine the subjective valuation of the considered moral actions. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: Scientific Reports
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/174487
ISSN: 2045-2322
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-11147-7
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