Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-01390-x
Title: Emergent patterns of collective cell migration under tubular confinement
Authors: Xi, W 
Sonam, S 
Beng Saw, T 
Ladoux, B 
Teck Lim, C 
Keywords: actin
baysilon
dimeticone
anatomy
cells and cell components
developmental biology
diameter
growth
movement
physiology
protein
scenario analysis
animal cell
Article
cell junction
cell migration
cell polarity
cell proliferation
epithelium
MDCK cell line
microtubule
nonhuman
algorithm
animal
biological model
cell adhesion
cell line
cell motion
dog
epithelium cell
human
metabolism
physiology
Algorithms
Animals
Cell Adhesion
Cell Line
Cell Movement
Dimethylpolysiloxanes
Dogs
Epithelial Cells
Humans
Madin Darby Canine Kidney Cells
Microtubules
Models, Biological
Issue Date: 2017
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Citation: Xi, W, Sonam, S, Beng Saw, T, Ladoux, B, Teck Lim, C (2017). Emergent patterns of collective cell migration under tubular confinement. Nature Communications 8 (1) : 1517. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-01390-x
Abstract: Collective epithelial behaviors are essential for the development of lumens in organs. However, conventional assays of planar systems fail to replicate cell cohorts of tubular structures that advance in concerted ways on out-of-plane curved and confined surfaces, such as ductal elongation in vivo. Here, we mimic such coordinated tissue migration by forming lumens of epithelial cell sheets inside microtubes of 1-10 cell lengths in diameter. We show that these cell tubes reproduce the physiological apical-basal polarity, and have actin alignment, cell orientation, tissue organization, and migration modes that depend on the extent of tubular confinement and/or curvature. In contrast to flat constraint, the cell sheets in a highly constricted smaller microtube demonstrate slow motion with periodic relaxation, but fast overall movement in large microtubes. Altogether, our findings provide insights into the emerging migratory modes for epithelial migration and growth under tubular confinement, which are reminiscent of the in vivo scenario. © 2017 The Author(s).
Source Title: Nature Communications
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/174386
ISSN: 2041-1723
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-01390-x
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