Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/24694452.2020.1723397
Title: Doing Family in "Times of Migration": Care Temporalities and Gender Politics in Southeast Asia
Authors: Yeoh, Brenda SA 
Somaiah, Bittiandra Chand 
Lam, Theodora 
Acedera, Kristel F 
Keywords: Social Sciences
Geography
care rhythms
gender roles
left-behind children
return migration
temporalities
transnational family
TRANSNATIONAL FAMILIES
IDENTITIES
MOBILITIES
INDONESIA
CHILDREN
MIGRANT
LABOR
Issue Date: 2020
Publisher: ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Citation: Yeoh, Brenda SA, Somaiah, Bittiandra Chand, Lam, Theodora, Acedera, Kristel F (2020). Doing Family in "Times of Migration": Care Temporalities and Gender Politics in Southeast Asia. ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF GEOGRAPHERS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/24694452.2020.1723397
Abstract: © 2020, © 2020 The Author(s). Published with license by Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. The prevailing labor migration regime in Asia is underpinned by rotating-door principles of enforced transience, where low-wage migrant labor gains admission into host nation-states based on short-term, time-limited contracts and where family reunification and permanent settlement at destination are explicitly prohibited. In this context, we ask how migrant-sending families in Southeast Asian “source” countries—Indonesia and the Philippines—sustain family life in the long-term absence of one or both parents (often mothers). Through temporal concepts of rhythm, rupture, and reversal, we focus on how temporal modalities of care for left-behind children intersect with gendered power geometries in animating transnational family politics around care. First, by paying heed to the structuring effects of rhythm on social life, we show how routinized care rhythms built around mothers as caregivers have a normalizing and naturalizing effect on the conduct of social life and commonplace understanding of family well-being. Second, we explore the potential rupture to care rhythms triggered by the migration of mothers turned breadwinners and the extent to which gendered care regimes are either conserved, reconstituted, or disrupted in everyday patterns and practices of care. Third, we examine the circumstances under which gender role reversal becomes enduring, gains legitimacy among a range of poly care rhythms, or is quickly undone with the return migration of mothers in homecoming. The analysis is based primarily on research on Indonesian and Filipino rural households conducted in 2017 using paired life story interviews with children and their parental or nonparental adult caregivers.
Source Title: ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF GEOGRAPHERS
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/171621
ISSN: 24694452
24694460
DOI: 10.1080/24694452.2020.1723397
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