Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136944
Title: Reliability and validity of the self- and interviewer-administered versions of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ)
Authors: Chu A.H.Y. 
Ng S.H.X. 
Koh D. 
Müller-Riemenschneider F. 
Brucki S.
Keywords: accelerometry
adult
age distribution
aged
Article
Chinese
comparative study
controlled study
criterion related validity
cross-sectional study
educational status
female
Global Physical Activity Questionnaire interviewer administered version
Global Physical Activity Questionnaire self administered version
human
male
moderate to vigorous physical activity
physical activity
psychometry
questionnaire
reliability
Singapore
test retest reliability
validity
vigorous intensity activity
exercise
middle aged
motor activity
physiology
procedures
questionnaire
reproducibility
self report
standards
time
validation study
world health organization
young adult
Accelerometry
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Psychometrics
Reproducibility of Results
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time
World Health Organization
Young Adult
Issue Date: 2015
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Chu A.H.Y., Ng S.H.X., Koh D., Müller-Riemenschneider F., Brucki S. (2015). Reliability and validity of the self- and interviewer-administered versions of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). PLoS ONE 10 (9) : e0136944. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0136944
Abstract: Objective: The Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) was originally designed to be interviewer-administered by the World Health Organization in assessing physical activity. The main aim of this study was to compare the psychometric properties of a self-administered GPAQ with the original interviewer-administered approach. Additionally, this study explored whether using different accelerometry-based physical activity bout definitions might affect the questionnaire's validity. Methods: A total of 110 participants were recruited and randomly allocated to an interviewer- (n = 56) or a self-administered (n = 54) group for test-retest reliability, of which 108 participants who met the wear time criteria were included in the validity study. Reliability was assessed by administration of questionnaires twice with a one-week interval. Criterion validity was assessed by comparing against seven-day accelerometer measures. Two definitions for accelerometry-data scoring were employed: (1) total-min of activity, and (2) 10-min bout. Results: Participants had similar baseline characteristics in both administration groups and no significant difference was found between the two formats in terms of validity (correlations between the GPAQ and accelerometer). For validity, the GPAQ demonstrated fair-to-moderate correlations for moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) for self-administration (rs = 0.30) and interviewer-administration (rs = 0.46). Findings were similar when considering 10-min activity bouts in the accelerometer analysis for MVPA (rs = 0.29 vs. 0.42 for self vs. interviewer). Within each mode of administration, the strongest correlations were observed for vigorous-intensity activity. However, Bland-Altman plots illustrated bias toward overestimation for higher levels of MVPA, vigorous- and moderate-intensity activities, and underestimation for lower levels of these measures. Reliability for MVPA revealed moderate correlations (rs = 0.61 vs. 0.63 for self vs. interviewer). Conclusions: Our findings showed comparability between both self- and interviewer-administration modes of the GPAQ. The GPAQ in general but especially the self-administered version may offer a relatively inexpensive method for measuring physical activity of various types and at different domains. However, there may be bias in the GPAQ measurements depending on the overall physical activity. It is advisable to incorporate accelerometers in future studies, particularly when measuring different intensities of physical activity. © 2015 Chu et al.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165685
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0136944
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