Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030493
Title: Chemically-induced cancers do not originate from bone marrow-derived cells
Authors: Lin H.
Hu L.
Chen L. 
Yu H.
Wang Q.
Chen P.
Hu X.-T.
Cai X.-J.
Guan X.-Y.
Keywords: CD45 antigen
diethylnitrosamine
vasculotropin receptor 1
carcinogen
animal cell
animal experiment
animal model
animal tissue
article
bladder cancer
bone marrow cell
bone marrow derived cell
bone marrow transplantation
cancer tissue
cell expansion
cellular distribution
chemical carcinogenesis
controlled study
disease association
female
fluorescence in situ hybridization
inflammation
liver cancer
lung cancer
lymphocyte count
male
mouse
nasopharynx cancer
nonhuman
protein expression
tissue section
animal
bone marrow transplantation
C57BL mouse
cancer stem cell
cell transformation
chemically induced disorder
chromosome aberration
drug effect
evaluation
metabolism
neoplasm
pathology
physiology
sex chromosome
sex chromosome aberration
Mus
Abnormal Karyotype
Animals
Bone Marrow Cells
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Carcinogens
Cell Transformation, Neoplastic
Diethylnitrosamine
Female
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Neoplasms
Neoplastic Stem Cells
Sex Chromosome Aberrations
Sex Chromosomes
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Public Library of Science
Citation: Lin H., Hu L., Chen L., Yu H., Wang Q., Chen P., Hu X.-T., Cai X.-J., Guan X.-Y. (2012). Chemically-induced cancers do not originate from bone marrow-derived cells. PLoS ONE 7 (1) : e30493. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030493
Abstract: Background: The identification and characterization of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is imperative to understanding the mechanism of cancer pathogenesis. Growing evidence suggests that CSCs play critical roles in the development and progression of cancer. However, controversy exists as to whether CSCs arise from bone marrow-derived cells (BMDCs). Methodology and Principal Findings: In the present study, n-nitrosodiethylamine (DEN) was used to induce tumor formation in female mice that received bone marrow from male mice. Tumor formation was induced in 20/26 mice, including 12 liver tumors, 6 lung tumors, 1 bladder tumor and 1 nasopharyngeal tumor. Through comparison of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) results in corresponding areas from serial tumor sections stained with H&E, we determined that BMDCs were recruited to both tumor tissue and normal surrounding tissue at a very low frequency (0.2-1% in tumors and 0-0.3% in normal tissues). However, approximately 3-70% of cells in the tissues surrounding the tumor were BMDCs, and the percentage of BMDCs was highly associated with the inflammatory status of the tissue. In the present study, no evidence was found to support the existence of fusion cells formed form BMDCs and tissue-specific stem cells. Conclusions: In summary, our data suggest that although BMDCs may contribute to tumor progression, they are unlike to contribute to tumor initiation. © 2012 Lin et al.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/165579
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030493
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