Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030819
Title: Mannose-binding Lectin 2 polymorphisms do not influence frequency or type of infection in adults with chemotherapy induced neutropaenia
Authors: Wong M.
Öhrmalm L.
Broliden K.
Aust C.
Hibberd M. 
Tolfvenstam T.
Keywords: mannose binding lectin 2
antiinfective agent
antineoplastic agent
C reactive protein
mannose binding lectin
MBL2 protein, human
article
bacterial infection
blood sampling
controlled study
cross-sectional study
disease duration
febrile neutropenia
fever
gene frequency
genetic association
genotype
human
infection sensitivity
mannose binding lectin 2 gene
mixed infection
mutator gene
neutropenia
promoter region
prospective study
protein blood level
single nucleotide polymorphism
virus infection
adult
blood
chemically induced disorder
fever
genetics
infection
metabolism
microbiology
neutropenia
Sweden
Adult
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Antineoplastic Agents
C-Reactive Protein
Fever
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Humans
Infection
Mannose-Binding Lectin
Neutropenia
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Sweden
Issue Date: 2012
Citation: Wong M., Öhrmalm L., Broliden K., Aust C., Hibberd M., Tolfvenstam T. (2012). Mannose-binding Lectin 2 polymorphisms do not influence frequency or type of infection in adults with chemotherapy induced neutropaenia. PLoS ONE 7 (2) : e30819. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0030819
Abstract: Background: Mannose-binding Lectin protein (MBL) has been suggested to be relevant in the defence against infections in immunosuppressed individuals. In a Swedish adult cohort immunosuppressed from both the underlying disease and from iatrogenic treatments for their underlying disease we investigated the role of MBL in susceptibility to infection. Methods: In this cross sectional, prospective study, blood samples obtained from 96 neutropaenic febrile episodes, representing 82 individuals were analysed for single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the MBL2 gene. Concurrent measurement of plasma MBL protein concentrations was also performed for observation of acute response during febrile episodes. Findings: No association was observed between MBL2 genotype or plasma MBL concentrations, and the type or frequency of infection. Adding to the literature, we found no evidence that viral infections or co-infections with virus and bacteria would be predisposed by MBL deficiency. We further saw no correlation between MBL2 genotype and the risk of fever. However, fever duration in febrile neutropaenic episodes was negatively associated with MBL2 SNP mutations (p<0.05). Patients with MBL2 SNP mutations presented a median febrile duration of 1.8 days compared with 3 days amongst patients with wildtype MBL2 genotype. Interpretation: We found no clear association between infection, or infection type to MBL2 genotypes or plasma MBL concentration, and add to the reports casting doubts on the benefit of recombinant MBL replacement therapy use during iatrogenic neutropaenia. © 2012 Wong et al.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/162000
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030819
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
10_1371_journal_pone_0030819.pdf301.22 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.