Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006958
Title: Intestinal microbiota regulate xenobiotic metabolism in the liver
Authors: Bj鰎kholm B.
Bok C.M.
Lundin A.
Rafter J.
Hibberd M.L. 
Pettersson S.
Keywords: constitutive androstane receptor
cytochrome P450
farnesoid X receptor
pentobarbital
retinoid X receptor
barbituric acid derivative
pentobarbital
xenobiotic agent
article
circadian rhythm
controlled study
gene expression
genetic regulation
intestine flora
liver
liver function
liver size
liver weight
male
microarray analysis
mouse
nonhuman
xenobiotic metabolism
animal
biological model
cell nucleus
DNA microarray
gene expression profiling
gene expression regulation
intestine
metabolism
microbiology
multigene family
time
Animalia
Mus
Animals
Barbiturates
Cell Nucleus
Gene Expression Profiling
Gene Expression Regulation
Intestines
Liver
Male
Mice
Models, Biological
Multigene Family
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Pentobarbital
Time Factors
Xenobiotics
Issue Date: 2009
Citation: Bj鰎kholm B., Bok C.M., Lundin A., Rafter J., Hibberd M.L., Pettersson S. (2009). Intestinal microbiota regulate xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. PLoS ONE 4 (9) : e6958. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006958
Abstract: Background: The liver is the central organ for xenobiotic metabolism (XM) and is regulated by nuclear receptors such as CAR and PXR, which control the metabolism of drugs. Here we report that gut microbiota influences liver gene expression and alters xenobiotic metabolism in animals exposed to barbiturates. Principal findings: By comparing hepatic gene expression on microarrays from germfree (GF) and conventionally-raised mice (SPF), we identified a cluster of 112 differentially expressed target genes predominantly connected to xenobiotic metabolism and pathways inhibiting RXR function. These findings were functionally validated by exposing GF and SPF mice to pentobarbital which confirmed that xenobiotic metabolism in GF mice is significantly more efficient (shorter time of anesthesia) when compared to the SPF group. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate that gut microbiota modulates hepatic gene expression and function by altering its xenobiotic response to drugs without direct contact with the liver. � 2009 Bj鰎kholm et al.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/161828
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006958
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