Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afp089
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dc.titleContinued work employment and volunteerism and mental well-being of older adults: Singapore longitudinal ageing studies
dc.contributor.authorSchwingel, A.
dc.contributor.authorNiti, M.M.
dc.contributor.authorTang, C.
dc.contributor.authorNg, T.P.
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-03T05:21:04Z
dc.date.available2014-04-03T05:21:04Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationSchwingel, A., Niti, M.M., Tang, C., Ng, T.P. (2009). Continued work employment and volunteerism and mental well-being of older adults: Singapore longitudinal ageing studies. Age and Ageing 38 (5) : 531-537. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afp089
dc.identifier.issn00020729
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/49984
dc.description.abstractObjective: to examine the effect of late life engagement in continued work involvement or volunteer activities during retirement on mental well-being. Methods: two waves of data from the Singapore Longitudinal Ageing Studies were analyzed for 2,716 Singaporeans aged 55 or above at baseline and 1,754 at 2-year follow-up. Trained research nurses interviewed participants (non-volunteering retiree, volunteering retiree, and working seniors) on mental health status (geriatric depression scale, Mini Mental State Examination, positive mental wellbeing and life satisfaction). Results: about 88% of seniors were retired (78% non-volunteering, 10% volunteering) and 12% were still working in paid employment or business. At baseline and 2 year follow up, and regardless of physical health status, volunteering retirees and working seniors gave significantly better MMSE cognitive performance scores, fewer depressive symptoms, and better mental well-being and life satisfaction than non-volunteering retirees. Conclusion: the results of this study suggest that continued work involvement or volunteerism provides opportunities for social interaction and engagement and may be associated with enhanced mental well-being. Future research should clarify which specific aspects of volunteerism are related to long-term mental well-being. © The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved.
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectElderly
dc.subjectMental well-being
dc.subjectOlder adults
dc.subjectRetirement
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectVolunteerism
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentPSYCHOLOGY
dc.contributor.departmentPSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE
dc.contributor.departmentASIA RESEARCH INSTITUTE
dc.description.doi10.1093/ageing/afp089
dc.description.sourcetitleAge and Ageing
dc.description.volume38
dc.description.issue5
dc.description.page531-537
dc.description.codenAANGA
dc.identifier.isiut000269193800009
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