Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)UP.1943-5444.0000014
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dc.titleAir temperature distribution and the influence of sky view factor in a green singapore estate
dc.contributor.authorHien, W.N.
dc.contributor.authorJusuf, S.K.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-14T04:55:38Z
dc.date.available2013-10-14T04:55:38Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationHien, W.N., Jusuf, S.K. (2010). Air temperature distribution and the influence of sky view factor in a green singapore estate. Journal of Urban Planning and Development 136 (3) : 261-272. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)UP.1943-5444.0000014
dc.identifier.issn07339488
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/46028
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates, first, the influence of vegetations to the air temperature distribution and, second, the correlation between air temperature and sky view factor (SVF) to understand whether the trees have adverse impact especially to the nighttime air temperature since trees reduce the SVF values. Air temperature and SVF measurements were conducted in a green Singapore estate, One-North, from November 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008. The field measurement results show that daytime air temperature difference between dense greenery area and less greenery area is 2.4 K and the nighttime air temperature difference is 1.1 K. The temperature maps study provides a clear picture on the air temperature distribution across the One-North estate and concludes that parks or clusters of trees are able to maintain both daytime and nighttime air temperature at a cool level. Statistical analysis was conducted to analyze the correlation between air temperature and SVF. During daytime, there is a significant and good correlation between air temperature and SVF. The higher the SVF, the higher is the air temperature. Trees reduce the sky openness and provide shading to the environment. At nighttime, there is a weak correlation between air temperature and SVF. Thus, there is no adverse impact, i.e., reduction of nighttime net long-wave loss, due to the reduction of SVF by trees. © 2010 ASCE.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)UP.1943-5444.0000014
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectAir temperature distribution
dc.subjectCorrelation analysis
dc.subjectGreen Singapore estate
dc.subjectSky view factor (SVF)
dc.subjectTropical climate
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBUILDING
dc.contributor.departmentDEAN'S OFFICE (SCHOOL OF DESIGN & ENV)
dc.description.doi10.1061/(ASCE)UP.1943-5444.0000014
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Urban Planning and Development
dc.description.volume136
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.page261-272
dc.identifier.isiut000280953000010
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