Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1108/09513570510584665
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dc.titlePower and international accounting standard setting: Evidence from segment reporting and intangible assets projects
dc.contributor.authorKwok, W.C.C.
dc.contributor.authorSharp, D.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-09T08:22:17Z
dc.date.available2013-10-09T08:22:17Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.citationKwok, W.C.C.,Sharp, D. (2005). Power and international accounting standard setting: Evidence from segment reporting and intangible assets projects. Accounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal 18 (1) : 74-99. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. <a href="https://doi.org/10.1108/09513570510584665" target="_blank">https://doi.org/10.1108/09513570510584665</a>
dc.identifier.issn09513574
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/44500
dc.description.abstractPurpose - This study provides significant empirical data and analysis on the international standard-setting process as conducted by the forerunner of the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). It reveals the influences from four key stakeholder groups (users, preparers, accountants, and regulators) in order to ascertain why International Accounting Standards (IAS) turn out the way they do. Design/methodology/approach - In-depth interviews with board representatives and content analysis of documents were used to provide triangulating perspectives. The concept of power from the sociological and political science literature provides the theoretical lens. The standard setting projects on segment reporting and intangible assets were studied in detail. Findings - The results show that the process can be best characterized as a mixed power system where no party is accorded the absolute power potential to dictate IAS. Nonetheless, while the user group is the target beneficiaries of IAS, the preparer group has significant influence, as inferred from the changes made to the IAS in line with the preparers' preferences. Research limitations/implications - There is always the possibility of researchers missing out on "secret" exercise of power, given that the focus of this study was on "public" paths of influence. After this study, the IASB's meetings became open to public, providing new opportunities for future research. Originality/value - This paper contributes to understanding accounting standard setting for international harmonization. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited. © Emerald Group Publishing Limited.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/09513570510584665
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectAccounting
dc.subjectGeneral management
dc.subjectIntangible assets
dc.subjectInternational standards
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentFINANCE & ACCOUNTING
dc.description.doi10.1108/09513570510584665
dc.description.sourcetitleAccounting, Auditing and Accountability Journal
dc.description.volume18
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page74-99
dc.identifier.isiutNOT_IN_WOS
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