Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2009.10.008
DC FieldValue
dc.titleElectrophysiological evidence of cerebellar fiber system involvement in the Miller Fisher syndrome
dc.contributor.authorLo, Y.L.
dc.contributor.authorRatnagopal, P.
dc.contributor.authorFook-Chong, S.
dc.contributor.authorChan, L.L.
dc.contributor.authorOng, W.Y.
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-18T08:44:38Z
dc.date.available2011-07-18T08:44:38Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationLo, Y.L., Ratnagopal, P., Fook-Chong, S., Chan, L.L., Ong, W.Y. (2010). Electrophysiological evidence of cerebellar fiber system involvement in the Miller Fisher syndrome. Journal of the Neurological Sciences 288 (1-2) : 49-53. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2009.10.008
dc.identifier.issn0022510X
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/23921
dc.description.abstractBackground: In the Miller Fisher syndrome (MFS), ataxia may be due involvement of Ia afferents and the cerebellum. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the cerebellum is known to interfere transiently with normal function. Methods: In this study, we utilized a previously described TMS protocol over the cerebellum in combination with ballistic movements to investigate cerebellar dysfunction in MFS patients. Results: The agonist (biceps) reaction time in MFS patients during a motor cancellation task was not significantly reduced during the initial TMS study. However, during the repeat TMS study, significant reduction was seen for all patients, in tandem with clinical recovery. There was significant correlation between anti-GQ1b IgG titers and change in agonist reaction time between the initial and repeat TMS studies. Conclusions: TMS likely affected horizontally orientated parallel fibers in the cerebellar molecular layer. During disease onset, antibody binding may have interfered with facilitation of reaction time during motor cancellation tasks seen in normal subjects. Normalization of reaction time facilitation corresponded to resolution of antibody-mediated interference in the molecular layer. Our study has provided evidence suggesting parallel fiber involvement in MFS, and suggested a role of anti-GQ1b IgG antibody in these changes. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2009.10.008
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectAnti-GQ1b IgG antibody
dc.subjectBallistic movement
dc.subjectCerebellum
dc.subjectMiller Fisher syndrome
dc.subjectTranscranial magnetic stimulation
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentANATOMY
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.jns.2009.10.008
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of the Neurological Sciences
dc.description.volume288
dc.description.issue1-2
dc.description.page49-53
dc.identifier.isiut000274042500007
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

7
checked on May 27, 2020

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

7
checked on May 27, 2020

Page view(s)

306
checked on May 13, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.