Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/236072
Title: Post-Crisis: In the Mood for Democracy
Authors: Joana Cheong Mesquita Ferreira
Keywords: Responsible/Proactive (Government)
Lawful
Stable/Sustainable (Socioeconomically)
Factionalized
Unequal
Democratically developed
Neoliberal
China (Political)
Socially United/Harmonious
Self-sufficient
Maladministered (Government)
Politically Obstructive
Educated Peaceful
Culturally/Ethnically Chinese
WWII
Honorable
Civil Liberties/Rights
China (Economic)
Loving (Husband-Wife)
HK as a Bridge/Hub
In Crisis (Economic)
Economically Modernized
Familial
Caring+G3
Issue Date: 2019
Publisher: National University of Singapore
Citation: Joana Cheong Mesquita Ferreira (2019). Post-Crisis: In the Mood for Democracy : 1-18. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The predominant discourse of Hong Kong (HK) national identity in 2010 was “well- governed”. This national identity was understood and engaged with differently among elites and masses. Bolstered by an ideology of economic neoliberalism, government elites tended to appraise their administration positively. The people, on the other hand, viewed the current government largely as a failure, and had begun to put their faith in a challenger ideology or discourse—“democratic”. The concepts of democracy and suffrage, combined with a vitriolic attack on authoritarian China and its ruling party, dominated mass consciousness. A democratic identity simultaneously criticized the shortcomings of HK’s administration in the aftermath of the 2008 Financial Tsunami and the city’s lack of democratic development.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/236072
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