Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-90453-7
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dc.titleA single serving of mixed spices alters gut microflora composition: a dose–response randomised trial
dc.contributor.authorKhine, Wei Wei Thwe
dc.contributor.authorHaldar, Sumanto
dc.contributor.authorDe Loi, Shou
dc.contributor.authorLee, Yuan-Kun
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-13T06:45:26Z
dc.date.available2022-10-13T06:45:26Z
dc.date.issued2021-05-28
dc.identifier.citationKhine, Wei Wei Thwe, Haldar, Sumanto, De Loi, Shou, Lee, Yuan-Kun (2021-05-28). A single serving of mixed spices alters gut microflora composition: a dose–response randomised trial. Scientific Reports 11 (1) : 11264. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-90453-7
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/233054
dc.description.abstractShort-term changes in dietary intake can induce changes in gut microbiome. While various dietary polyphenols have been shown to modulate gut microflora, the acute influence of polyphenol-rich mixed spices has not been explored in a controlled setting. We investigated the effects of a single serving of mixed spices Indian curry consumption, in two separate doses, on the gut microbiome in 15 healthy, Singaporean Chinese males, with age and BMI of 23.5 ± 2.4 years and 22.9 ± 2.2 kg/m2 respectively. We found that a low-polyphenol, no spices Dose 0 Control (D0C) meal led to an increase in Bacteroides and a decrease in Bifidobacterium. In comparison to D0C, there was significant suppression of Bacteroides (p < 0.05) and an increase in Bifidobacterium (p < 0.05) with increasing doses of curry meal Dose 1 Curry (D1C) and Dose 2 Curry (D2C) containing 6 g and 12 g mixed spices respectively. Significant correlations were also found between bacterial changes and plasma phenolic acids. No differences between treatments were observed in the alpha-diversity of the gut microflora. This study has shown that a single serving of mixed spices can significantly modify/restore certain commensal microbes, particularly in people who do not regularly consume these spices. © 2021, The Author(s).
dc.publisherNature Research
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceScopus OA2021
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF MICROBIOLOGY & IMMUNOLOGY
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF SURGERY
dc.description.doi10.1038/s41598-021-90453-7
dc.description.sourcetitleScientific Reports
dc.description.volume11
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page11264
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