Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.5334/gh.950
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dc.titleThe world heart federation global study on COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease
dc.contributor.authorSliwa, Karen
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Kavita
dc.contributor.authorRaspail, Lana
dc.contributor.authorOjji, Dike
dc.contributor.authorLam, Carolyn S. P.
dc.contributor.authorThienemann, Friedrich
dc.contributor.authorGe, Junbo
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Amitava
dc.contributor.authorKristin Newby, L.
dc.contributor.authorRibeiro, Antonio Luiz P.
dc.contributor.authorGidding, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorPinto, Fausto
dc.contributor.authorPerel, Pablo
dc.contributor.authorPrabhakaran, Dorairaj
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-11T08:04:48Z
dc.date.available2022-10-11T08:04:48Z
dc.date.issued2021-01-01
dc.identifier.citationSliwa, Karen, Singh, Kavita, Raspail, Lana, Ojji, Dike, Lam, Carolyn S. P., Thienemann, Friedrich, Ge, Junbo, Banerjee, Amitava, Kristin Newby, L., Ribeiro, Antonio Luiz P., Gidding, Samuel, Pinto, Fausto, Perel, Pablo, Prabhakaran, Dorairaj (2021-01-01). The world heart federation global study on COVID-19 and cardiovascular disease. Global Heart 16 (1) : 22. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.5334/gh.950
dc.identifier.issn2211-8160
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/232163
dc.description.abstractBackground: The emergence of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), has presented an unprecedented global challenge for the healthcare community. The ability of SARS-CoV-2 to get transmitted during the asymptomatic phase, and its high infectivity have led to the rapid transmission of COVID-19 beyond geographic regions facilitated by international travel, leading to a pandemic. To guide effective control and interventions, primary data is required urgently, globally, including from low- and middle-income countries where documentation of cardiovascular manifestations and risk factors in people hospitalized with COVID-19 is limited. Objectives: This study aims to describe the cardiovascular manifestations and cardiovascular risk factors in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Methods: We propose to conduct an observational cohort study involving 5000 patients recruited from hospitals in low-, middle- and high-income countries. Eligible adult COVID-19 patients will be recruited from the participating hospitals and followed-up until 30 days post admission. The outcomes will be reported at discharge and includes the need of ICU admission, need of ventilator, death (with cause), major adverse cardiovascular events, neurological outcomes, acute renal failure, and pulmonary outcomes. Conclusion: Given the enormous burden posed by COVID-19 and the associated severe prognostic implication of CVD involvement, this study will provide useful insights on the risk factors for severe disease, clinical presentation, and outcomes of various cardiovascular manifestations in COVID-19 patients particularly from low and middle income countries from where the data remain scant. © 2021 The Author(s).
dc.publisherWeb Portal Ubiquity Press
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceScopus OA2021
dc.subjectCardiovascular disease
dc.subjectChagas disease
dc.subjectCohort
dc.subjectCoronavirus
dc.subjectCOVID-19
dc.subjectHIV
dc.subjectRegistry
dc.subjectRheumatic heart disease
dc.subjectSurvey
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.description.doi10.5334/gh.950
dc.description.sourcetitleGlobal Heart
dc.description.volume16
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page22
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