Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124553
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dc.titleDevelopment and validation of a lifestyle behavior tool in overweight and obese women through qualitative and quantitative approaches
dc.contributor.authorKu, Chee Wai
dc.contributor.authorLoo, Rachael Si Xuan
dc.contributor.authorLim, Cheryl Jia En
dc.contributor.authorTan, Jacinth J. X.
dc.contributor.authorHo, Joey Ee Wen
dc.contributor.authorHan, Wee Meng
dc.contributor.authorNg, Xiang Wen
dc.contributor.authorChan, Jerry Kok Yen
dc.contributor.authorYap, Fabian
dc.contributor.authorLoy, See Ling
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-11T07:44:29Z
dc.date.available2022-10-11T07:44:29Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-20
dc.identifier.citationKu, Chee Wai, Loo, Rachael Si Xuan, Lim, Cheryl Jia En, Tan, Jacinth J. X., Ho, Joey Ee Wen, Han, Wee Meng, Ng, Xiang Wen, Chan, Jerry Kok Yen, Yap, Fabian, Loy, See Ling (2021-12-20). Development and validation of a lifestyle behavior tool in overweight and obese women through qualitative and quantitative approaches. Nutrients 13 (12) : 4553. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13124553
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/231891
dc.description.abstractThere is a paucity of effective intervention tools for overweight/obese women to assess, guide and monitor their eating behavior. This study aimed to develop a lifestyle intervention tool, assess its acceptability and usefulness, and verify its construct validity in overweight/obese women. The 6P tool (Portion, Proportion, Pleasure, Phase, Physicality, Psychology) was developed and 15 women with a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 25 kg/m2 were interviewed to assess its perceived acceptability and usefulness. Subsequently, the revised 6P tool was tested in 46 women with a BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. The Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire (TFEQ), International Physical Activity Questionnaire-Short (IPAQ), and weight were measured at baseline and one-month. Most participants were satisfied with the presentation of the 6P tool (86.8%), and agreed it was useful in guiding healthy eating (81.6%) and raising awareness of eating behavior (97.4%). There were significant improvements in cognitive restraint (p = 0.010) and disinhibition (p = 0.030) (TFEQ), portion size (P1), pleasure behaviors (P3), and total composite 6P score (p < 0.001). However, there was no significant reduction in weight or increase in physical activity. The 6P tool is acceptable and presents with good validity for assessing lifestyle behaviors. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceScopus OA2021
dc.subject6P
dc.subjectHealthy nutrition
dc.subjectLifestyle behavior tool
dc.subjectObesity
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS OFFICE OF ACAD & CLINICAL DEVT
dc.description.doi10.3390/nu13124553
dc.description.sourcetitleNutrients
dc.description.volume13
dc.description.issue12
dc.description.page4553
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