Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/230316
Title: PARENTING STYLES AND NONSUICIDAL SELF-INJURY: DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN ADOLESCENTS AND PARENTAL PERCEPTIONS OF PARENTING STYLES AS A PREDICTOR FOR NSSI BEHAVIOUR
Authors: WONG QIU YAN
Keywords: Nonsuicidal Self-Injury (NSSI)
Adolescents
Parenting styles
Discrepancies in parenting styles
Multi-informant
Issue Date: 16-May-2022
Citation: WONG QIU YAN (2022-05-16). PARENTING STYLES AND NONSUICIDAL SELF-INJURY: DISCREPANCIES BETWEEN ADOLESCENTS AND PARENTAL PERCEPTIONS OF PARENTING STYLES AS A PREDICTOR FOR NSSI BEHAVIOUR. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This study investigates parenting styles and discrepancies in parenting styles associated with adolescents who exhibit nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) behaviours. The participants (N = 237) include adolescents aged 12 to 25 (M = 16.6) and their parent. Adolescents who engage in NSSI behaviours were recruited from the National University Hospital Singapore, while adolescents who do not engage in NSSI were recruited from the community by convenience sampling. Self-report questionnaires, including parenting styles and demographic variables, were administered to NSSI and community recruited control parent-child dyads. Multivariate analysis of covariances and multivariate logistic regression models were used to analyse the results. Results revealed significant relationship between parenting styles and NSSI behaviours. Discrepancies in authoritarian and authoritative parenting perceptions among parent-child dyads were significantly greater among the NSSI group than control group. Permissive parenting style increased the odds of NSSI occurrence, while authoritative parenting decreased the odds of NSSI behaviour. Finally, results revealed that discrepancies in perceived authoritarian parenting significantly predicted NSSI behaviour above and beyond that of parents' and adolescents’ perceptions of parenting style. This paper supports the use of a multi-informant approach in assessing parenting. Clinical applicability of the research was also discussed.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/230316
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