Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-11381-8
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dc.titleOlder adults have difficulty decoding emotions from the eyes, whereas easterners have difficulty decoding emotion from the mouth
dc.contributor.authorLow, Anna CY
dc.contributor.authorOh, Vincent YS
dc.contributor.authorTong, Eddie MW
dc.contributor.authorScarf, Damian
dc.contributor.authorRuffman, Ted
dc.date.accessioned2022-07-15T00:50:36Z
dc.date.available2022-07-15T00:50:36Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-06
dc.identifier.citationLow, Anna CY, Oh, Vincent YS, Tong, Eddie MW, Scarf, Damian, Ruffman, Ted (2022-05-06). Older adults have difficulty decoding emotions from the eyes, whereas easterners have difficulty decoding emotion from the mouth. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS 12 (1). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-022-11381-8
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/228596
dc.description.abstractOlder adults and Easterners have worse emotion recognition (than young adults and Westerners, respectively), but the question of why remains unanswered. Older adults look less at eyes, whereas Easterners look less at mouths, raising the possibility that compelling older adults to look at eyes, and Easterners to look at mouths, might improve recognition. We did this by comparing emotion recognition in 108 young adults and 109 older adults from New Zealand and Singapore in the (a) eyes on their own (b) mouth on its own or (c) full face. Older adults were worse than young adults on 4/6 emotions with the Eyes Only stimuli, but only 1/6 emotions with the Mouth Only stimuli. In contrast, Easterners were worse than Westerners on 6/6 emotions for Mouth Only and Full Face stimuli, but were equal on all six emotions for Eyes Only stimuli. These results provide a substantial leap forward because they point to the precise difficulty for older adults and Easterners. Older adults have more consistent difficulty identifying individual emotions in the eyes compared to the mouth, likely due to declining brain functioning, whereas Easterners have more consistent difficulty identifying emotions from the mouth than the eyes, likely due to inexperience inferring mouth information.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherNATURE PORTFOLIO
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectScience & Technology
dc.subjectMultidisciplinary Sciences
dc.subjectScience & Technology - Other Topics
dc.subjectFACIAL EXPRESSIONS
dc.subjectCULTURAL-DIFFERENCES
dc.subjectRECOGNITION
dc.subjectAGE
dc.subjectPATTERNS
dc.subjectIDENTIFICATION
dc.subjectJAPANESE
dc.subjectFACES
dc.subjectYOUNG
dc.subjectEAST
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2022-07-13T09:40:12Z
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PSYCHOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1038/s41598-022-11381-8
dc.description.sourcetitleSCIENTIFIC REPORTS
dc.description.volume12
dc.description.issue1
dc.published.statePublished
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