Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/226231
Title: PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROFILE AND POTENTIAL NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS OF BIO-TRANSFORMED OKARA
Authors: WANG XINGYI
Keywords: Okara, hydrolysis, prebiotic, probiotic
Issue Date: 22-Jan-2022
Citation: WANG XINGYI (2022-01-22). PHYSICOCHEMICAL PROFILE AND POTENTIAL NUTRITIONAL BENEFITS OF BIO-TRANSFORMED OKARA. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: In this study, three commercial enzymes (Viscozyme-L, Pectinase-Salus and Cellulase-Salus) were optimized for okara hydrolysis. Viscozyme-L and Pectinase-Salus significantly reduced insoluble dietary fiber (from 65.3% to 46.48% and 45.64%, respectively), released soluble dietary fiber (from 4.47% to 8.76% and 12.13%, respectively) and monosaccharides (xylose, glucose and arabinose). Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactiplantibacillus plantarum R1012 were grew better in okara treated with Viscozyme-L (8.69 and 9.2-log CFU/mL) or Pectinase-Salus (8.49 and 9.4-log CFU/mL), compared to raw okara (7.69 and 7.79-log CFU/mL). Cellulase-Salus induced limited fiber conversion but released the highest amount of free isoflavone. Combined enzymatic hydrolysis and probiotic fermentation reduced off-flavor compounds (hexanal, 2-hexanal, 2-pentylfuran and nonanal) in okara. Moreover, GPC, FT-IR, proximate analysis and selective fermentation revealed that the soluble fiber in okara hydrolysates were mainly low molecular weight, pectin-like polysaccharides with prebiotic potential. This work demonstrated the potential to combine enzymatic hydrolysis and probiotic fermentation on okara valorization
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/226231
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Open)

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