Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221978
Title: AN INVESTIGATION ON THE LEVELS OF INTEGRATION FOR FAçADE LAYERS AND PREFABRICATED COMPONENTS IN RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE HEIGHT OF BUILDING
Authors: CHUNG CHIA LING
Keywords: Architecture
Design Technology and Sustainability
Shinya Okuda
2010/2011 DTS
Assembly
Building height
Components
Facade
Function
Integration
Layers
Performance
Post-and-rail construction
Skins
Issue Date: 14-Jan-2011
Citation: CHUNG CHIA LING (2011-01-14). AN INVESTIGATION ON THE LEVELS OF INTEGRATION FOR FAçADE LAYERS AND PREFABRICATED COMPONENTS IN RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE HEIGHT OF BUILDING. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The demands for façade integration originate in the need for construction efficiency and economic returns. With growing awareness for sustainable living in recent years, the design for high-rise façade aims for a more economical and sustainable energy consumption pattern through the integration of more environmental functions. A context-specific exploration examines façade integration in relation to building height in the temperate climate. Two types of façade integration were developed for the purpose of this paper, namely Layer and Skin. For optimal façade performance and construction efficiency, it is predicated that, as building height increases, the number of façade layers decreases and merges into set of material components (skin) for optimal façade performance. Further, the greater the building height, the more efficient is the construction method using frame construction over the post-andrail façade construction. Following this, case studies compares façade integration in buildings of different height. This investigation on the levels of integration for façade layers and components in relation to building height, aims to provide architects and façade designers a new understanding that informs the rationale and subjectivity behind façade integration.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221978
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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