Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221439
Title: CHINATOWN: THE CLOSET QUEER ENCLAVE OF SINGAPORE
Authors: LIM YI KAI ALPHONSO
Keywords: Real Estate
RE
Zhu Jieming
2014/2015 RE
Enclave
Queer
LGBTQ
Ethnic
Chinatown
Tanjong Pagar
Shop house
Urban
Conservation
Planning
Governance
Issue Date: 20-May-2015
Citation: LIM YI KAI ALPHONSO (2015-05-20). CHINATOWN: THE CLOSET QUEER ENCLAVE OF SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This dissertation, motivated by the lack of knowledge concerning Singapore’s Queer community, strives to explain the form, mechanism, and location of a possible Queer enclave. It seeks to comprehend the differences between the Queer enclave and the ethnic enclaves (namely Little India, Chinatown, and Kampong Glam) to provide a better appreciation of the factors contributing to the birth and evolution of enclaves of different dispositions. To understand the different perspectives to this matter, 15 interviews and a qualitative survey targeting 200 respondents were carried out. Though the results and contributions of these sources strongly suggest that there exists a Queer enclave in Singapore, the enclave appears to be incomplete, largely commercial and stigmatised by the mainstream society, hence bearing more similarities to unofficial foreigners’ enclaves such as Little Philippines (Lucky Plaza) and Little Thailand (Golden Mile Complex) than to the ethnic enclaves. However, from the government’s perspective, there is no preferential regulation or governance for these different areas. Chinatown is identified as the home to the Queer enclave, which appears perplexing as this accords the area associations with two distinct and incongruent communities. The dual-role of Chinatown has perhaps contributed to the common affiliation of Tanjong Pagar to Queer activities, though from a planning point of view, this is inaccurate. The area’s distance from the heartlands and the conservation policies in place would ensure the preservation of autonomous shop houses while preventing a likely influx of residential buildings and users, unknowingly creating a medium that is favourable for the subsistence of the closet Queer enclave of Singapore.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/221439
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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