Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220429
Title: ELEVATED PUBLIC SPACES IN HIGH-DENSITY LIVING: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE USAGE OF MULTI-TIER ELEVATED PUBLIC SPACES AND ITS IMPACT ON SOCIAL INTERACTION IN SINGAPORE
Authors: CHENG DING YI
Keywords: Architecture
Design Track
DT
Master (Architecture)
Tan Beng Kiang
2016/2017 Aki DT
Public space
Singapore
Issue Date: 5-Dec-2016
Citation: CHENG DING YI (2016-12-05). ELEVATED PUBLIC SPACES IN HIGH-DENSITY LIVING: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE USAGE OF MULTI-TIER ELEVATED PUBLIC SPACES AND ITS IMPACT ON SOCIAL INTERACTION IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The trend towards higher density towns and lusher and greener HDB estates has resulted in the proliferation of elevated public spaces as the new communal spaces in the design of HDB estates. Consequently, the usage of these elevated public spaces and their effectiveness in promoting social interaction in high-density living has become more critical. Previous research on elevated public spaces has provided insights on the evolution and impact of roof garden green spaces on community bonding. However, there has been a lack of study on the multi-tier elevated public space typology which in itself can manifest in many forms; in terms of the number of tiers of sky gardens and the combination of different types of elevated space. Therefore, this dissertation will focus on the comparative study of the multi-tier typology of elevated public space in high-density housing through 3 case studies- The Pinnacle@Duxton, SkyVille@Dawson and SkyTerrace@Dawson. It will examine how the design and planning of these elevated public spaces affect its usage and impact on social interaction. Qualitative and quantitative methods were applied in analysing the three case studies, including observational techniques, space analysis, mass survey, and interviews with residents staying in these estates.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220429
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