Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220062
Title: STATUS REVIEW OF THE TRADE IN WEDGEFISHES (FAMILY RHINIDAE) AND GIANT GUITARFISHES (FAMILY GLAUCOSTEGIDAE) IN SINGAPORE
Authors: CHOY PEI PEI CHRISTINA
Keywords: MEM
2019/2020 EnvM
Madhu Rao
M.Sc. (Environmental Management)
Issue Date: 5-Jan-2021
Citation: CHOY PEI PEI CHRISTINA (2021-01-05). STATUS REVIEW OF THE TRADE IN WEDGEFISHES (FAMILY RHINIDAE) AND GIANT GUITARFISHES (FAMILY GLAUCOSTEGIDAE) IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The wedgefishes and giant guitarfishes (families Rhinidae and Glaucostegidae) are exposed to extremely high risk of extinction due to exploitation in the target and bycatch fisheries driven by the trade in meat and fins, limited biological productivity and ongoing habitat destruction. Urgency for conservation efforts on these rays have led to the inclusion in the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora Appendix II. Signatory parties to CITES, including Singapore, are obliged to regulate international trade in these species through the use of a permitting system and implement controls within their borders. Given that Singapore is a major hub for trade in shark fins and meat, this study documented the volume, composition and trends in landings of wedgefishes and giant guitarfishes in fishery ports (Chapter 2). Key players and trade flows within the supply chain were also identified in Chapter 3 so that authorities can establish effective engagement to involve stakeholders and individuals affected by the new CITES listings, in the decision-making process for managing the trade. Findings also revealed the presence of wedgefishes and giant guitarfishes in shark and ray products commercially available in domestic market and highlighted the poor information indicated on labels of these products (Chapter 4). The lack of traceability systems and labelling with additional details thus would encourage more illegally sourced products to enter markets and meet consumer demands. A proactive approach aimed at implementing trade surveillance and capacity building, improving labelling requirements as well as creating increased awareness were therefore set out for Singapore to adopt (Chapter 5) so that this small island state can do much more in combating illegal wildlife trade and ensuring sustainability of these endangered species in the fisheries.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/220062
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