Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219810
Title: TACKLING THE DETERIORATING RECYCLING RATE OF PLASTIC IN SINGAPORE
Authors: PEH YONG DE NIGEL
Keywords: Audrey Chia
2018/2019 EnvM
Environmental Management
MEM
Master (Environmental Management)
Study Report (MEM)
Issue Date: 2-Jan-2020
Citation: PEH YONG DE NIGEL (2020-01-02). TACKLING THE DETERIORATING RECYCLING RATE OF PLASTIC IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Singapore has been in the forefront in terms of implementing initiatives to manage waste generation. However the amount of waste generated has substantially increased, due to increasing population and rising affluence of Singaporeans. In 2017, a record-low recycling rate of 6% for plastic has set the alarm bells ringing. Furthermore, recent news such as giant seas of floating plastic waste, as well as plastics being ingested by sea animals have put plastic waste under the spotlight. One of the reasons for the low plastic recycling rate in Singapore is due to the lack of knowledge on plastic identification and segregation. This lack of knowledge has resulted in the bulk of plastic products being disposed of as general waste. To understand how other leading countries manage this issue, case studies on best practices around the world, particularly in Rwanda, Taiwan, Japan, Belgium and Sweden, were conducted. From the case studies, there are several potential and feasible policies that can be applied in Singapore to improve the recycling rate of plastic. One such policy is the “Pay as You Throw” (PAYT) scheme, which is based on the polluter-pays principle. It works by charging waste collection fees according to the weight or volume of waste generated, instead of the current fixed rate charge in Singapore. PAYT would encourage people to sort their waste properly into the different recyclable waste streams, and lead to less waste being diverted to the incineration plants and landfill. In conclusion, the Singapore government needs to address the high consumption of plastic as well as to improve its low and stagnating recycling rate quickly. This is especially vital as Semakau Landfill, the only active landfill in Singapore, is filling up at an alarming rate. Semakau Landfill was supposed to be sufficient for Singapore’s dumping needs until 2045, but it might reach it capacity ten years earlier due to the growing problem of disposable plastics.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219810
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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