Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219754
Title: KRANJI ECO RESORT: ODE TO NATURE IN A POST- NATURAL LANDSCAPE
Authors: KANG HUI LING GERMAINE ROSE
Keywords: Architecture
Design Technology and Sustainability
DTS
Master
Chang Jiat Hwee
2013/2014 Aki DTS
Bio remediation
Masterplan
Urban eco resort
Issue Date: 25-Aug-2014
Citation: KANG HUI LING GERMAINE ROSE (2014-08-25). KRANJI ECO RESORT: ODE TO NATURE IN A POST- NATURAL LANDSCAPE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This thesis explores how an eco resort can be designed in an urban area like Singapore, where much nature that exists has been heavily influenced by the human hand. It is proposed as a rethinking of conventional eco resorts- typically found in remote areas with pristine nature, yet despite attention to conservation initiatives have significant environmental impacts- as well as to establish a symbiotic relationship between development and conservation, often presented as a zero sum game. Urban areas are not devoid of nature. However as a result of deforestation and development, a significant proportion of nature exists in the form of ecologically poor managed vegetation. With rapid urban encroachment into rural areas, it is ever pertinent to protect and enhance existing ecologically rich ecosystems, as well as help urban residents develop awareness and appreciation for nature that exists in their backyard. The proposal therefore selects a somewhat degraded natural site at Kranji, whose nature was formed through direct human influence and has no ‘untouched’ quality to speak of. The Western shore of the Kranji Reservoir is covered in marshes- the only open water marsh habitat in Singapore, and one that is not indigenous to the country. The same area once comprised saltwater mangroves fringing a tidal river. Its damming to form the reservoir flooded the mangroves with freshwater, destroying much of them, and accumulation of its decaying organic matter created conditions for the colonization of marsh vegetation. Heterogeneity of the landscape supports a wide diversity of wildlife, and the area is particularly known for birds, especially waterfowl. Over the years, embankment of several rivers has diverted water flow, causing parts of the marshes to suffer from long term dehydration- including loss of several open water ponds, attractive to wading birds. Additionally, direct channeling of surface runoff from concrete canals to the marshes means the latter is fed by water with high nutrient loads. This increases growth rate of invasive weeds and other species that clog open water ponds while wiping out less tolerant vegetation. Currently, bimonthly vegetation clearance lasting a week and costing $4000 a session is required to maintain the marshes. These conditions can be improved by reverting the main canal into a naturalized swale and integrating it with an artificial wetland to pre treat water before its discharge into the marshes. The wetland further serves as an expanded habitat, especially when other open water ponds are dried up during periods of seasonal dryness. The eco resort is integrated with the water treatment process. Additionally, different interfaces with the water help guests to better appreciate the human interventions implemented to improve conditions of the marshes. Overall, the intervention also assists in the creation of different habitat niches that would take decades to form through evolutionary processes.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/219754
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Restricted)

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