Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-87789-5
DC FieldValue
dc.titleTask-related brain functional network reconfigurations relate to motor recovery in chronic subcortical stroke
dc.contributor.authorCheng, HJ
dc.contributor.authorNg, KK
dc.contributor.authorQian, X
dc.contributor.authorJi, F
dc.contributor.authorLu, ZK
dc.contributor.authorTeo, WP
dc.contributor.authorHong, X
dc.contributor.authorNasrallah, FA
dc.contributor.authorAng, KK
dc.contributor.authorChuang, KH
dc.contributor.authorGuan, C
dc.contributor.authorYu, H
dc.contributor.authorChew K.K.
dc.contributor.authorZhou, JH
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-15T00:27:21Z
dc.date.available2021-11-15T00:27:21Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-01
dc.identifier.citationCheng, HJ, Ng, KK, Qian, X, Ji, F, Lu, ZK, Teo, WP, Hong, X, Nasrallah, FA, Ang, KK, Chuang, KH, Guan, C, Yu, H, Chew K.K., Zhou, JH (2021-12-01). Task-related brain functional network reconfigurations relate to motor recovery in chronic subcortical stroke. Scientific Reports 11 (1) : 8442-. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-87789-5
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322,2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/206096
dc.description.abstractStroke leads to both regional brain functional disruptions and network reorganization. However, how brain functional networks reconfigure as task demand increases in stroke patients and whether such reorganization at baseline would facilitate post-stroke motor recovery are largely unknown. To address this gap, brain functional connectivity (FC) were examined at rest and motor tasks in eighteen chronic subcortical stroke patients and eleven age-matched healthy controls. Stroke patients underwent a 2-week intervention using a motor imagery-assisted brain computer interface-based (MI-BCI) training with or without transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Motor recovery was determined by calculating the changes of the upper extremity component of the Fugl–Meyer Assessment (FMA) score between pre- and post-intervention divided by the pre-intervention FMA score. The results suggested that as task demand increased (i.e., from resting to passive unaffected hand gripping and to active affected hand gripping), patients showed greater FC disruptions in cognitive networks including the default and dorsal attention networks. Compared to controls, patients had lower task-related spatial similarity in the somatomotor–subcortical, default–somatomotor, salience/ventral attention–subcortical and subcortical–subcortical connections, suggesting greater inefficiency in motor execution. Importantly, higher baseline network-specific FC strength (e.g., dorsal attention and somatomotor) and more efficient brain network reconfigurations (e.g., somatomotor and subcortical) from rest to active affected hand gripping at baseline were related to better future motor recovery. Our findings underscore the importance of studying functional network reorganization during task-free and task conditions for motor recovery prediction in stroke.
dc.publisherSpringer Science and Business Media LLC
dc.sourceElements
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2021-11-10T08:04:04Z
dc.contributor.departmentBIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PHYSIOLOGY
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.contributor.departmentMEDICINE
dc.description.doi10.1038/s41598-021-87789-5
dc.description.sourcetitleScientific Reports
dc.description.volume11
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page8442-
dc.published.stateUnpublished
dc.description.redepositcompleted
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Task-related brain functional network reconfigurations relate to motor recovery in chronic subcortical stroke.pdfPublished version3.31 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download
Task-related brain functional network reconfigurations relate to motor recovery in chronic subcortical stroke.pdf3.31 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

6
checked on Jun 22, 2022

Page view(s)

67
checked on Jun 23, 2022

Download(s)

2
checked on Jun 23, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.