Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1145/3460319.3464821
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dc.titleAutomated patch backporting in Linux (experience paper)
dc.contributor.authorShariffdeen, Ridwan
dc.contributor.authorGao, Xiang
dc.contributor.authorDuck, Gregory J
dc.contributor.authorTan, Shin Hwei
dc.contributor.authorLawall, Julia
dc.contributor.authorRoychoudhury, Abhik
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-21T01:57:37Z
dc.date.available2021-07-21T01:57:37Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-11
dc.identifier.citationShariffdeen, Ridwan, Gao, Xiang, Duck, Gregory J, Tan, Shin Hwei, Lawall, Julia, Roychoudhury, Abhik (2021-07-11). Automated patch backporting in Linux (experience paper). ISSTA '21: 30th ACM SIGSOFT International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1145/3460319.3464821
dc.identifier.isbn9781450384599
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/194529
dc.description.abstractWhenever a bug or vulnerability is detected in the Linux kernel, the kernel developers will endeavour to fix it by introducing a patch into the mainline version of the Linux kernel source tree. However, many users run older łstablež versions of Linux, meaning that the patch should also be łbackportedž to one or more of these older kernel versions. This process is error-prone and there is usually a long delay in publishing the backported patch. Based on an empirical study, we show that around 8% of all commits submitted to Linux mainline are backported to older versions, but often more than one month elapses before the backport is available. Hence, we propose a patch backporting technique that can automatically transfer patches from the mainline version of Linux into older stable versions. Our approach first synthesizes a partial transformation rule based on a Linux mainline patch. This rule can then be generalized by analysing the alignment between the mainline and target versions. The generalized rule is then applied to the target version to produce a backported patch. We have implemented our transformation technique in a tool called FixMorph and evaluated it on 350 Linux mainline patches. FixMorph correctly backports 75.1% of them. Compared to existing techniques, FixMorph improves both the precision and recall in backporting patches. Apart from automation of software maintenance tasks, patch backporting helps in reducing the exposure to known security vulnerabilities in stable versions of the Linux kernel.
dc.publisherACM
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectPatch Backporting
dc.subjectLinux Kernel
dc.subjectProgram Transformation
dc.typeConference Paper
dc.date.updated2021-07-19T08:38:43Z
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE
dc.description.doi10.1145/3460319.3464821
dc.description.sourcetitleISSTA '21: 30th ACM SIGSOFT International Symposium on Software Testing and Analysis
dc.published.statePublished
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