Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092783
DC FieldValue
dc.titleChrononutrition during pregnancy: A review on maternal night-time eating
dc.contributor.authorLoy S.L.
dc.contributor.authorLoo R.S.X.
dc.contributor.authorGodfrey K.M.
dc.contributor.authorChong Y.-S.
dc.contributor.authorShek L.P.-C.
dc.contributor.authorTan K.H.
dc.contributor.authorChong M.F.-F.
dc.contributor.authorChan J.K.Y.
dc.contributor.authorYap F.
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-27T08:40:07Z
dc.date.available2021-01-27T08:40:07Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.citationLoy S.L., Loo R.S.X., Godfrey K.M., Chong Y.-S., Shek L.P.-C., Tan K.H., Chong M.F.-F., Chan J.K.Y., Yap F. (2020). Chrononutrition during pregnancy: A review on maternal night-time eating. Nutrients 12 (9) : 1 - 16. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12092783
dc.identifier.issn20726643
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/185883
dc.description.abstractEvidence from women working night shifts during pregnancy indicates that circadian rhythm disruption has the potential to adversely influence pregnancy outcomes. In the general population, chronodisruption with the potential to affect pregnancy outcomes may also be seen in those with high energy intakes in the evening or at night. However, maternal night eating during pregnancy remains understudied. This narrative review provides an overview of the prevalence, contributing factors, nutritional aspects and health implications of night eating during pregnancy. We derived evidence based on cross-sectional studies and longitudinal cohorts. Overall, night eating is common during pregnancy, with the estimated prevalence in different populations ranging from 15% to 45%. The modern lifestyle and the presence of pregnancy symptoms contribute to night eating during pregnancy, which is likely to coexist and may interact with multiple undesirable lifestyle behaviors. Unfavorable nutritional characteristics associated with night eating have the potential to induce aberrant circadian rhythms in pregnant women, resulting in adverse metabolic and pregnancy outcomes. More research, particularly intervention studies, are needed to provide more definite information on the implications of night eating for mother-offspring health. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectChrononutrition
dc.subjectCircadian rhythm
dc.subjectLifestyle behavior
dc.subjectNight eating
dc.subjectPregnancy
dc.typeReview
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF PAEDIATRICS
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.description.doi10.3390/nu12092783
dc.description.sourcetitleNutrients
dc.description.volume12
dc.description.issue9
dc.description.page1 - 16
dc.published.statePublished
dc.grant.idNMRC/TCR/004-NUS/2008
dc.grant.idNMRC/TCR/012-NUHS/2014
dc.grant.fundingagencyNational Medical Research Council
dc.description.seriesGUSTO (Growing up towards Healthy Outcomes)
Appears in Collections:Elements
Staff Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
(255).pdf777.88 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

PublishedView/Download

Page view(s)

57
checked on Apr 29, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.