Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7070090
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dc.titleBrain interaction during cooperation: Evaluating local properties of multiple-brain network
dc.contributor.authorSciaraffa, N
dc.contributor.authorBorghini, G
dc.contributor.authorAricò, P
dc.contributor.authorDi Flumeri, G
dc.contributor.authorColosimo, A
dc.contributor.authorBezerianos, A
dc.contributor.authorThakor, N.V
dc.contributor.authorBabiloni, F
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-21T07:47:56Z
dc.date.available2020-10-21T07:47:56Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationSciaraffa, N, Borghini, G, Aricò, P, Di Flumeri, G, Colosimo, A, Bezerianos, A, Thakor, N.V, Babiloni, F (2017). Brain interaction during cooperation: Evaluating local properties of multiple-brain network. Brain Sciences 7 (7) : 90. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci7070090
dc.identifier.issn20763425
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/178660
dc.description.abstractSubjects’ interaction is the core of most human activities. This is the reason why a lack of coordination is often the cause of missing goals, more than individual failure. While there are different subjective and objective measures to assess the level of mental effort required by subjects while facing a situation that is getting harder, that is, mental workload, to define an objective measure based on how and if team members are interacting is not so straightforward. In this study, behavioral, subjective and synchronized electroencephalographic data were collected from couples involved in a cooperative task to describe the relationship between task difficulty and team coordination, in the sense of interaction aimed at cooperatively performing the assignment. Multiple-brain connectivity analysis provided information about the whole interacting system. The results showed that averaged local properties of a brain network were affected by task difficulty. In particular, strength changed significantly with task difficulty and clustering coefficients strongly correlated with the workload itself. In particular, a higher workload corresponded to lower clustering values over the central and parietal brain areas. Such results has been interpreted as less efficient organization of the network when the subjects’ activities, due to high workload tendencies, were less coordinated. © 2017 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20201031
dc.subjectcoordination
dc.subjectelectroencephalogram
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectworkload
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentLIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGG
dc.description.doi10.3390/brainsci7070090
dc.description.sourcetitleBrain Sciences
dc.description.volume7
dc.description.issue7
dc.description.page90
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