Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5340-x
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dc.titleAdequacy of public health communications on H7N9 and MERS in Singapore: Insights from a community based cross-sectional study
dc.contributor.authorHou, Y
dc.contributor.authorTan, Y.-R
dc.contributor.authorLim, W.Y
dc.contributor.authorLee, V
dc.contributor.authorTan, L.W.L
dc.contributor.authorChen, M.I.-C
dc.contributor.authorYap, P
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-09T10:09:10Z
dc.date.available2020-09-09T10:09:10Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationHou, Y, Tan, Y.-R, Lim, W.Y, Lee, V, Tan, L.W.L, Chen, M.I.-C, Yap, P (2018). Adequacy of public health communications on H7N9 and MERS in Singapore: Insights from a community based cross-sectional study. BMC Public Health 18 (1) : 436. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-5340-x
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175395
dc.description.abstractBackground: Singapore remains vulnerable to worldwide epidemics due to high air traffic with other countries This study aims to measure the public's awareness of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Avian Influenza A (H7N9), identify population groups who are uninformed or misinformed about the diseases, understand their choice of outbreak information source, and assess the effectiveness of communication channels in Singapore. Methods: A cross-sectional study, comprising of face-to-face interviews, was conducted between June and December 2013 to assess the public's awareness and knowledge of MERS and H7N9, including their choice of information source. Respondents were randomly selected and recruited from 3 existing cohort studies. An opportunistic sampling approach was also used to recruit new participants or members in the same household through referrals from existing participants. Results: Out of 2969 participants, 53.2% and 79.4% were not aware of H7N9 and MERS respectively. Participants who were older and better educated were most likely to hear about the diseases. The mean total knowledge score was 9.2 (S.D ± 2.3) out of 20, and 5.9 (S.D ± 1.2) out of 10 for H7N9 and MERS respectively. Participants who were Chinese, more educated and older had better knowledge of the diseases. Television and radio were the primary sources of outbreak information regardless of socio-demographic factors. Conclusion: Heightening education of infectious outbreaks through appropriate media to the young and less educated could increase awareness. © 2018 The Author(s).
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20200831
dc.subjectadolescent
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectattitude to health
dc.subjectCoronavirus infection
dc.subjectcross-sectional study
dc.subjectepidemic
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectinfluenza
dc.subjectInfluenza A virus (H7N9)
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectmedical information
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectpublic health
dc.subjectradio
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectsocioeconomics
dc.subjectstandards
dc.subjecttelevision
dc.subjectvery elderly
dc.subjectyoung adult
dc.subjectAdolescent
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAged, 80 and over
dc.subjectCoronavirus Infections
dc.subjectCross-Sectional Studies
dc.subjectDisease Outbreaks
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHealth Communication
dc.subjectHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectInfluenza A Virus, H7N9 Subtype
dc.subjectInfluenza, Human
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPublic Health
dc.subjectRadio
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectSocioeconomic Factors
dc.subjectTelevision
dc.subjectYoung Adult
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.contributor.departmentDEAN'S OFFICE (SSH SCH OF PUBLIC HEALTH)
dc.description.doi10.1186/s12889-018-5340-x
dc.description.sourcetitleBMC Public Health
dc.description.volume18
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page436
dc.published.statePublished
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