Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3634-4
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dc.titleCan caregivers report their care recipients' post-stroke hospitalizations and outpatient visits accurately? Findings of an Asian prospective stroke cohort 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services
dc.contributor.authorTyagi S.
dc.contributor.authorKoh G.C.-H.
dc.contributor.authorLuo N.
dc.contributor.authorTan K.B.
dc.contributor.authorHoenig H.
dc.contributor.authorMatchar D.B.
dc.contributor.authorYoong J.
dc.contributor.authorFinkelstein E.A.
dc.contributor.authorLee K.E.
dc.contributor.authorVenketasubramanian N.
dc.contributor.authorMenon E.
dc.contributor.authorChan K.M.
dc.contributor.authorDe Silva D.A.
dc.contributor.authorYap P.
dc.contributor.authorTan B.Y.
dc.contributor.authorChew E.
dc.contributor.authorYoung S.H.
dc.contributor.authorNg Y.S.
dc.contributor.authorTu T.M.
dc.contributor.authorAng Y.H.
dc.contributor.authorKong K.H.
dc.contributor.authorSingh R.
dc.contributor.authorMerchant R.A.
dc.contributor.authorChang H.M.
dc.contributor.authorYeo T.T.
dc.contributor.authorNing C.
dc.contributor.authorCheong A.
dc.contributor.authorNg Y.L.
dc.contributor.authorTan C.S.
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-09T09:53:19Z
dc.date.available2020-09-09T09:53:19Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationTyagi S., Koh G.C.-H., Luo N., Tan K.B., Hoenig H., Matchar D.B., Yoong J., Finkelstein E.A., Lee K.E., Venketasubramanian N., Menon E., Chan K.M., De Silva D.A., Yap P., Tan B.Y., Chew E., Young S.H., Ng Y.S., Tu T.M., Ang Y.H., Kong K.H., Singh R., Merchant R.A., Chang H.M., Yeo T.T., Ning C., Cheong A., Ng Y.L., Tan C.S. (2018). Can caregivers report their care recipients' post-stroke hospitalizations and outpatient visits accurately? Findings of an Asian prospective stroke cohort 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services. BMC Health Services Research 18 (1) : 817. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-018-3634-4
dc.identifier.issn1472-6963
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/175361
dc.description.abstractBackground: Health services research aimed at understanding service use and improving resource allocation often relies on collecting subjectively reported or proxy-reported healthcare service utilization (HSU) data. It is important to know the discrepancies in such self or proxy reports, as they have significant financial and policy implications. In high-dependency populations, such as stroke survivors, with varying levels of cognitive impairment and dysphasia, caregivers are often potential sources of stroke survivors' HSU information. Most of the work conducted on agreement analysis to date has focused on validating different sources of self-reported data, with few studies exploring the validity of caregiver-reported data. Addressing this gap, our study aimed to quantify the agreement across the caregiver-reported and national claims-based HSU of stroke patients. Methods: A prospective study comprising multi-ethnic stroke patient and caregiver dyads (N = 485) in Singapore was the basis of the current analysis, which used linked national claims records. Caregiver-reported health services data were collected via face-to-face and telephone interviews, and similar health services data were extracted from the national claims records. The main outcome variable was the modified intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), which provided the level of agreement across both data sources. We further identified the amount of over- or under-reporting by caregivers across different service types. Results: We observed variations in agreement for different health services, with agreement across caregiver reports and national claims records being the highest for outpatient visits (specialist and primary care), followed by hospitalizations and emergency department visits. Interestingly, caregivers over-reported hospitalizations by approximately 49% and under-reported specialist and primary care visits by approximately 20 to 30%. Conclusions: The accuracy of the caregiver-reported HSU of stroke patients varies across different service types. Relatively more objective data sources, such as national claims records, should be considered as a first choice for quantifying health care usage before considering caregiver-reported usage. Caregiver-reported outpatient service use was relatively more accurate than inpatient service use over shorter recall periods. Therefore, in situations where objective data sources are limited, caregiver-reported outpatient information can be considered for low volumes of healthcare consumption, using an appropriate correction to account for potential under-reporting. © 2018 The Author(s).
dc.sourceUnpaywall 20200831
dc.subjectadult
dc.subjectarticle
dc.subjectcaregiver
dc.subjectcohort analysis
dc.subjectcontrolled study
dc.subjectcorrelation coefficient
dc.subjectemergency ward
dc.subjectfemale
dc.subjecthealth science
dc.subjecthospital patient
dc.subjecthospitalization
dc.subjecthuman
dc.subjectmajor clinical study
dc.subjectmale
dc.subjectoutcome variable
dc.subjectoutpatient care
dc.subjectprimary medical care
dc.subjectprospective study
dc.subjectpublic health
dc.subjectrecall
dc.subjectrecipient
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectstroke patient
dc.subjecttelephone interview
dc.subjectvalidation process
dc.subjectvalidity
dc.subjectaged
dc.subjectambulatory care
dc.subjectcaregiver
dc.subjectcerebrovascular accident
dc.subjectclinical trial
dc.subjectcohort analysis
dc.subjecthospitalization
dc.subjectmethodology
dc.subjectmiddle aged
dc.subjectmulticenter study
dc.subjectprimary health care
dc.subjectprospective study
dc.subjectproxy
dc.subjectpsychology
dc.subjectself report
dc.subjectstandards
dc.subjectstatistics and numerical data
dc.subjectsurvivor
dc.subjectAdult
dc.subjectAged
dc.subjectAmbulatory Care
dc.subjectCaregivers
dc.subjectCohort Studies
dc.subjectFacilities and Services Utilization
dc.subjectFemale
dc.subjectHospitalization
dc.subjectHumans
dc.subjectMale
dc.subjectMental Recall
dc.subjectMiddle Aged
dc.subjectPrimary Health Care
dc.subjectProspective Studies
dc.subjectProxy
dc.subjectResearch Design
dc.subjectSelf Report
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.subjectStroke
dc.subjectSurvivors
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentSAW SWEE HOCK SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS MEDICAL SCHOOL
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF MEDICINE
dc.description.doi10.1186/s12913-018-3634-4
dc.description.sourcetitleBMC Health Services Research
dc.description.volume18
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page817
dc.published.statePublished
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