Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2020.03.029
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dc.titleBlue Light-Directed Cell Migration, Aggregation, and Patterning
dc.contributor.authorZhang, J
dc.contributor.authorLuo, Y
dc.contributor.authorPoh, CL
dc.date.accessioned2020-05-11T02:30:46Z
dc.date.available2020-05-11T02:30:46Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-01
dc.identifier.citationZhang, J, Luo, Y, Poh, CL (2020-01-01). Blue Light-Directed Cell Migration, Aggregation, and Patterning. Journal of Molecular Biology. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2020.03.029
dc.identifier.issn00222836
dc.identifier.issn10898638
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/167912
dc.description.abstract© 2020 Elsevier Ltd Bacterial motility is related to many cellular activities, such as cell migration, aggregation, and biofilm formations. The ability to control motility and direct the bacteria to certain location could be used to guide the bacteria in applications such as seeking for and killing pathogen, forming various population-level patterns, and delivering of drugs and vaccines. Currently, bacteria motility is mainly controlled by chemotaxis (prescribed chemical stimuli), which needs physical contact with the chemical inducer. This lacks the flexibility for pattern formation as it has limited spatial control. To overcome the limitations, we developed blue light-regulated synthetic genetic circuit to control bacterial directional motility, by taking the advantage that light stimulus can be delivered to cells in different patterns with precise spatial control. The circuit developed enables programmed Escherichia coli cells to increase directional motility and move away from the blue light, i.e., that negative phototaxis is utilized. This further allows the control of the cells to form aggregation with different patterns. Further, we showed that the circuit can be used to separate two different strains. The demonstrated ability of blue light-controllable gene circuits to regulate a CheZ expression could give researchers more means to control bacterial motility and pattern formation.
dc.publisherElsevier BV
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectdirectional motility
dc.subjectoptogenetics
dc.subjectpatterning
dc.subjectstrain separation
dc.subjectsynthetic gene circuits
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2020-05-11T02:00:17Z
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.jmb.2020.03.029
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Molecular Biology
dc.published.statePublished
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