Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153779
Title: NURSES’ PERCEPTION OF A PEER SUPPORT SERVICE TO MANAGE EMOTIONAL STRESS IN A SINGAPORE TERTIARY HOSPITAL – A QUALITATIVE STUDY
Authors: LIM SHIN YING
Keywords: emotional support
peer support
institutional
nursing
perception
qualitative study
Issue Date: 25-May-2019
Citation: LIM SHIN YING (2019-05-25). NURSES’ PERCEPTION OF A PEER SUPPORT SERVICE TO MANAGE EMOTIONAL STRESS IN A SINGAPORE TERTIARY HOSPITAL – A QUALITATIVE STUDY. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Aim: To explore nurses’ perceptions of emotional stress, peer support to manage their emotional stress, and barriers that hinder them from seeking support, and linking up with institutional peer support services. Background: There is growing importance of institutional support and peer support in determining attrition rates of nurses. By understanding nurses’ perceptions on emotional stress, peer support, and barriers in seeking institutional support, organizations can anticipate and cater to nurses’ needs. Currently there is no study focusing on the barriers that nurses face in seeking institutional support, and the relation to their perceived emotional stress and peer support. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study where data was collected through individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews using an interview guide. Purposive sampling of 20 registered nurses working in medical wards of a local acute tertiary hospital. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was achieved. Thematic analysis was conducted simultaneously with data collection. Results: Three main categories: “Nature of Practice”, “Channels of Support”, and “Organizational Culture” emerged from thematic analysis, explaining how stress has shaped nurses’ needs of peer support, followed by the intention of making peer support an organizational culture. Conclusion: Nurses and nursing leaders advocate to establish a supportive culture to combat workplace negativity. Nurses highly appreciate lateral approaches from high management, and trainings that improve their capabilities in providing peer support. Implications to practice: There is unanimous desire to establish a supportive culture to combat workplace negativity. This can be expanded at various levels in the organisation: resilience trainings for staffs, engagements to lessen hierarchy, and the use of technology to improve interconnectedness across institute are all viable ways to improve peer support accessibility for nurses.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/153779
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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