Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1177/0268580905049909
DC FieldValue
dc.titleFeuds and legacies: Conflict and inheritance in Chinese family businesses
dc.contributor.authorKiong, T.C.
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-13T05:39:12Z
dc.date.available2016-12-13T05:39:12Z
dc.date.issued2005-03
dc.identifier.citationKiong, T.C. (2005-03). Feuds and legacies: Conflict and inheritance in Chinese family businesses. International Sociology 20 (1) : 45-70+121. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1177/0268580905049909
dc.identifier.issn02685809
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/133017
dc.description.abstractThe remarkable economic performance of the Southeast Asian region has provoked debates among social scientists. One key area of contention is whether there is a particular form of capitalism to account for the East Asian phenomenon. Most of the studies conducted, however, have focused either on national industrial policies and market forces or on a broad cultural explanatory view, such as recourse to Confucianism or Asian values. This article, building on work done by these scholars, seeks to look at not only the effectiveness of business networks in the expansion of businesses, but more importantly, and an area that has been largely unexplored, the drawbacks of Asian business networking. Some questions that the article sets out to answer include: Are there any issues of conflict and inheritance that are exclusive to Chinese family business? If yes, what are they and why are these issues unique to Chinese family business? Is there a particular way that Chinese businesses deal with these issues? Most studies on Chinese family firms and business networks have focused on 'success'. This article seeks to study business failures, focusing on issues of conflict and inheritance. In a sense, it looks at the 'dark side' or dysfunctions of family business, filling an important gap in the current research literature. Using extensive case study interviews conducted in Singapore and Malaysia, as well as fieldwork in China, the article examines the intricate processes in running a family enterprise as well as the nature and management of conflicts.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0268580905049909
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectBusiness
dc.subjectChina
dc.subjectFamily firms
dc.subjectGuanxi
dc.subjectPersonalism
dc.subjectSingapore
dc.typeReview
dc.contributor.departmentSOCIOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1177/0268580905049909
dc.description.sourcetitleInternational Sociology
dc.description.volume20
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page45-70+121
dc.identifier.isiut000227445400003
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

5
checked on Jan 15, 2020

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

8
checked on Jan 7, 2020

Page view(s)

44
checked on Jan 17, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.