Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1111/aor.12014
DC FieldValue
dc.titleDecellularized porcine saphenous artery for small-diameter tissue-engineered conduit graft
dc.contributor.authorXiong, Y.
dc.contributor.authorChan, W.Y.
dc.contributor.authorChua, A.W.C.
dc.contributor.authorFENG JIAJUN
dc.contributor.authorGopal, P.
dc.contributor.authorOng, Y.S.
dc.contributor.authorSong, C.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-02T10:29:48Z
dc.date.available2016-06-02T10:29:48Z
dc.date.issued2013-06
dc.identifier.citationXiong, Y., Chan, W.Y., Chua, A.W.C., FENG JIAJUN, Gopal, P., Ong, Y.S., Song, C. (2013-06). Decellularized porcine saphenous artery for small-diameter tissue-engineered conduit graft. Artificial Organs 37 (6) : E74-E87. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1111/aor.12014
dc.identifier.issn0160564X
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/125014
dc.description.abstractDecellularized xenografts have been identified as potential scaffolds for small-diameter vascular substitutes. This study aimed to develop and investigate a biomechanically functional and biocompatible acellular conduit using decellularized porcine saphenous arteries (DPSAs), through a modified decellularization process using Triton X-100/NH4OH solution and serum-containing medium. Histological and biochemical analysis indicated a high degree of cellular removal and preservation of the extracellular matrix. Bursting pressure tests showed that the DPSAs could withstand a pressure of 1854±164mmHg. Assessment of in vitro cell adhesion and biocompatibility showed that porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells were able to adhere and proliferate on DPSAs in static and rotational culture. After interposition into rabbit carotid arteries in vivo, DPSAs showed patency rates of 60% at 1 month and 50% at 3 months. No aneurysm and intimal hyperplasia were observed in any DPSAs. All patent grafts showed regeneration of vascular elements, and thrombotic occlusion was found to be the main cause of graft failure, probably due to remaining xenoantigens. In conclusion, this study showed the development and evaluation of a decellularization process with the potential to be used as small-diameter grafts. © 2013, Authors. Artificial Organs © 2013, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aor.12014
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectArtery
dc.subjectDecellularization
dc.subjectSmall-diameter vascular grafts
dc.subjectTissue engineering
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL S'PORE
dc.description.doi10.1111/aor.12014
dc.description.sourcetitleArtificial Organs
dc.description.volume37
dc.description.issue6
dc.description.pageE74-E87
dc.description.codenARORD
dc.identifier.isiut000320193300001
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

30
checked on Jun 7, 2021

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

29
checked on Jun 7, 2021

Page view(s)

95
checked on Jun 6, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.