Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.telpol.2011.02.008
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dc.titleICT as a source of economic growth in the information age: Empirical evidence from the 19962005 period
dc.contributor.authorVu, K.M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-02T04:37:28Z
dc.date.available2016-06-02T04:37:28Z
dc.date.issued2011-05
dc.identifier.citationVu, K.M. (2011-05). ICT as a source of economic growth in the information age: Empirical evidence from the 19962005 period. Telecommunications Policy 35 (4) : 357-372. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.telpol.2011.02.008
dc.identifier.issn03085961
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/124915
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the hypothesis that ICT penetration has positive effects on economic growth. On theoretical grounds, this paper discusses three channels through which ICT penetration can affect growth: (i) fostering technology diffusion and innovation; (ii) enhancing the quality of decision-making by firms and households; and (iii) increasing demand and reducing production costs, which together raises the output level. This paper conducts three empirical exercises to provide a comprehensive documentation of the role of ICT as a source of growth in the 19962005 period. The first exercise shows that growth in 19962005 improved relative to the previous two decades and experienced a very significant structural change. The second exercise uses the traditional cross-country regression method to identify a strong association between ICT penetration and growth during 19962005, controlling for other potential growth drivers and country-fixed effects. The third exercise uses the system Generalized Method of Moment (GMM) for dynamic panel data analysis to tease out the causal link between ICT penetration and growth. This analysis also shows that, for the average country, the marginal effect of the penetration of internet users was larger than that of mobile phones, which in turn is larger than that of personal computers. The marginal effect of ICT penetration, however, lessens as the penetration increases. This paper points out several policy implications drawn from its analyses and findings. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.telpol.2011.02.008
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectEconomic growth
dc.subjectICT penetration
dc.subjectInternet
dc.subjectMobile phones
dc.subjectPersonal computers
dc.subjectTechnology diffusion
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentLEE KUAN YEW SCHOOL OF PUBLIC POLICY
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.telpol.2011.02.008
dc.description.sourcetitleTelecommunications Policy
dc.description.volume35
dc.description.issue4
dc.description.page357-372
dc.description.codenTEPOD
dc.identifier.isiut000290746600007
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