Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.2947
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dc.titlePredictors of postpartum weight change among overweight and obese women: Results from the active mothers postpartum study
dc.contributor.authorØstbye, T.
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, B.L.
dc.contributor.authorKrause, K.M.
dc.contributor.authorSwamy, G.K.
dc.contributor.authorLovelady, C.A.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-26T08:29:58Z
dc.date.available2014-11-26T08:29:58Z
dc.date.issued2012-02-01
dc.identifier.citationØstbye, T., Peterson, B.L., Krause, K.M., Swamy, G.K., Lovelady, C.A. (2012-02-01). Predictors of postpartum weight change among overweight and obese women: Results from the active mothers postpartum study. Journal of Women's Health 21 (2) : 215-222. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.2947
dc.identifier.issn15409996
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/110223
dc.description.abstractBackground: The postpartum period may be critical for the development of midlife obesity. Identifying factors associated with postpartum weight change could aid in targeting women for healthy lifestyle interventions. Methods: Data from Active Mothers Postpartum (AMP), a study of overweight and obese postpartum women (n=450), were analyzed to determine the effect of baseline characteristics, breastfeeding, diet, physical activity, and contraception on weight change from 6 weeks to 12, 18, and 24 months postpartum. The repeated measures mixed model was used to test the association of these effects with weight change. Results: Although mean weight loss was modest (0.49 kg by 24 months), the range of weight change was striking (+21.5 kg to-24.5 kg, standard deviation [SD] 7.4). Controlling only for baseline weight, weight loss was associated with breastfeeding, hormonal contraception, lower junk food and greater healthy food intake, and greater physical activity. Only junk food intake and physical activity were significant after controlling for all other predictors. Conclusions: Eating less healthy foods and being less physically active put overweight and obese women at risk of gaining more weight after a pregnancy. © 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.2947
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDUKE-NUS GRADUATE MEDICAL SCHOOL S'PORE
dc.description.doi10.1089/jwh.2011.2947
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Women's Health
dc.description.volume21
dc.description.issue2
dc.description.page215-222
dc.description.codenJWHOA
dc.identifier.isiut000300240400015
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