Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwj144
Title: Vapor, dust, and smoke exposure in relation to adult-onset asthma and chronic respiratory symptoms: The Singapore Chinese Health Study
Authors: LeVan, T.D.
Koh, W.-P. 
Lee, H.-P. 
Koh, D. 
Yu, M.C.
London, S.J.
Keywords: Asthma
Bronchitis, chronic
Occupational diseases
Occupational exposure
Pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive
Issue Date: Jun-2006
Citation: LeVan, T.D., Koh, W.-P., Lee, H.-P., Koh, D., Yu, M.C., London, S.J. (2006-06). Vapor, dust, and smoke exposure in relation to adult-onset asthma and chronic respiratory symptoms: The Singapore Chinese Health Study. American Journal of Epidemiology 163 (12) : 1118-1128. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwj144
Abstract: Occupational factors contribute to a significant fraction of respiratory disease and symptoms. The authors evaluated the role of occupational exposures in asthma, chronic bronchitis, and respiratory symptoms in the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based cohort of adults aged 45-74 years at enrollment in 1993-1998. Information on occupations and occupational exposures was collected at enrollment for 52,325 subjects for whom respiratory outcomes were obtained via follow-up interviews in 1999-2004. Exposure to dusts from cotton, wood, metal, minerals, and/or asbestos was associated with nonchronic cough and/or phlegm (odds ratio (OR) = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08, 1.30), chronic bronchitis (OR = 1.26, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.57), and adult-onset asthma (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.30). Cotton dust was the major contributor to respiratory symptoms. Vapor exposure from chemical solvents, dyes, cooling oils, paints, wood preservatives, and/or pesticides was associated with nonchronic cough or phlegm (OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.27), chronic dry cough (OR = 1.55, 95% CI: 1.19, 2.01), and adult-onset asthma (OR = 1.34, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.56). Chemical solvents, cooling oils, and pesticides were the major contributors to respiratory symptoms. These data support the role of occupational exposures in the etiology of respiratory illness in a population-based cohort in Singapore with a low prevalence of atopic illness. Copyright © 2006 by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health All rights reserved.
Source Title: American Journal of Epidemiology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108598
ISSN: 00029262
DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwj144
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