Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.05.005
Title: The effect of neighborhood, socioeconomic status and a community-based program on multi-disease health screening in an Asian population: A controlled intervention study
Authors: Wee, L.E.
Koh, G.C.H. 
Keywords: Colorectal cancer
Diabetes mellitus
Health screening
Hyperlipidemia
Hypertension
Multi-disease
Socioeconomic status
Issue Date: Jul-2011
Citation: Wee, L.E., Koh, G.C.H. (2011-07). The effect of neighborhood, socioeconomic status and a community-based program on multi-disease health screening in an Asian population: A controlled intervention study. Preventive Medicine 53 (1-2) : 64-69. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.05.005
Abstract: Objectives: We studied whether individual socioeconomic and neighborhood factors such as living in a poor community independently affected health screening participation. Methods: We studied 3 blocks of public-rental flats (the poorer neighborhood) adjacent to 3 blocks of owner-occupied public housing (the better-off neighborhood) in a precinct in Taman Jurong, Singapore. Demographic details and reasons for not having regular hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia and colorectal cancer screening were collected from 2009 to 2010. An access-enhancing intervention was implemented in both neighborhoods to raise health screening rates. Results: Participation rates for rental flats and owner-occupied flats were 89.0% (356/400) and 70.2% (351/500) respectively. Living in a better-off neighborhood was independently associated with diabetes mellitus (66% vs. 35%, adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.12, p < 0.01), hyperlipidemia (53% vs. 26%, AOR = 4.34, p < 0.01) and colorectal cancer screening (17% vs. 6%, AOR = 15.43, p < 0.01), as were individual socioeconomic factors such as employment, need for financial aid and household income. Uptake of all screening modalities significantly increased in the poorer neighborhood post-intervention (all p < 0.05). Cost was cited more commonly as a barrier to health screening in the poorer neighborhood. Conclusion: Differing neighborhoods within one geographical location, as well as individual socioeconomic factors, were independently associated with differences in health screening. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.
Source Title: Preventive Medicine
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108570
ISSN: 00917435
DOI: 10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.05.005
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