Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/marc.200900934
Title: Intracellular protein delivery systems formed by noncovalent bonding interactions between amphipathic peptide carriers and protein cargos
Authors: Lo, S.O.
Wang, S. 
Keywords: Biomaterials
Drug delivery systems
Peptides
Selfassembly
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2010
Citation: Lo, S.O., Wang, S. (2010-07-01). Intracellular protein delivery systems formed by noncovalent bonding interactions between amphipathic peptide carriers and protein cargos. Macromolecular Rapid Communications 31 (13) : 1134-1141. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/marc.200900934
Abstract: Successful molecular therapy using protein-based therapeutic agents for intracellular targets depends on the development of efficient and safe protein delivery systems that are able to overcome the problem of poor permeability of cell membrane to proteins. Here, we summarize recent studies elucidating how one particular class of peptide-based carriers, amphipathic peptide, has been designed and utilized for intracellular protein delivery in a simple yet effective manner. The unique feature of these delivery systems lies in the noncovalent binding of amphipathic peptides to protein cargos, mainly through hydrophobic interactions. At least five different types of amphipathic peptides have been developed and demonstrated to be able to deliver various biologically active proteins into a variety of cell types without the use of chemical conjugation. In view of their efficiency and presumably low toxicity, we anticipate that amphipathic peptides will continue to be developed as powerful carriers for intracellular delivery of protein therapeutics. © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
Source Title: Macromolecular Rapid Communications
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/102475
ISSN: 10221336
DOI: 10.1002/marc.200900934
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