Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4565(01)00018-3
Title: The combined effects of temperature and diet on development and survival of a crab spider, Misumenops tricuspidatus (Fabricius) (Araneae: Thomisidae)
Authors: Li, D. 
Keywords: Araneae
Crab spider
Development time
Diet
Life history
Lower development threshold
Misumenops tricuspidatus
Sum of effective temperature
Temperature
Thomisidae
Issue Date: 2002
Citation: Li, D. (2002). The combined effects of temperature and diet on development and survival of a crab spider, Misumenops tricuspidatus (Fabricius) (Araneae: Thomisidae). Journal of Thermal Biology 27 (2) : 83-93. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0306-4565(01)00018-3
Abstract: In the present study, the combined effects of temperature and diet on development and survival of a crab spider, Misumenops tricuspidatus (Fabricius) (Araneae: Thomisidae) in laboratory conditions were investigated. The experiments were carried out at five constant temperatures ranging from 15°C to 35°C on two kinds of diets, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster) and a mixed diet of fruit flies and dung flies. It was found that development rate of eggs increased with successive temperature increments, reaching a maximum at 30°C, then declined at 32°C and that eggs survived well between 20°C and 30°C (> 70%), but no eggs survived to hatching at 35°C regardless of whether the spiders were fed on single or mixed diet. Juveniles completed development on both diets at all constant temperatures tested, but survival was low at the extreme temperatures. Juvenile development times decreased over successive temperature increments up to 30°C, then increased at 32°C. Females developed faster than males. Diet also influenced development time, survival and number of moults to reach maturity. Juveniles raised on the mixed diet composed of fruit flies and dung flies developed faster, survived better, and required fewer moults to reach maturity than on a diet composed of only fruit flies. Plots of development rates (reciprocal of mean development times) and survival rates (expressed as percentages) against constant temperatures indicated that M. tricuspidatus is well adapted to low temperatures, but detrimentally affected by high temperatures. Using linear regression, the lower development threshold (LDT) and the sum of effective temperatures (SET) for all life stages of M. tricuspidatus on each diet were estimated. LDT and SET varied among developmental stages and between diets. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Journal of Thermal Biology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/101883
ISSN: 03064565
DOI: 10.1016/S0306-4565(01)00018-3
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