Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.192439499
Title: A global pH sensor: Agrobacterium sensor protein ChvG regulates acid-inducible genes on its two chromosomes and Ti plasmid
Authors: Li, L.
Jia, Y.
Hou, Q.
Charles, T.C.
Nester, E.W.
Pan, S.Q. 
Issue Date: 17-Sep-2002
Source: Li, L., Jia, Y., Hou, Q., Charles, T.C., Nester, E.W., Pan, S.Q. (2002-09-17). A global pH sensor: Agrobacterium sensor protein ChvG regulates acid-inducible genes on its two chromosomes and Ti plasmid. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 99 (19) : 12369-12374. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.192439499
Abstract: A sensor protein ChvG is part of a chromosomally encoded two-component regulatory system ChvG/Chvl that is important for the virulence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens. However, it is not clear what genes ChvG regulates or what signal(s) it senses. In this communication, we demonstrate that ChvG is involved in the regulation of acid-inducible genes, including aopB and katA, residing on the circular and linear chromosomes, respectively, and the tumor-inducing (Ti)-plasmid-harbored vir genes, virB and virE. ChvG was absolutely required for the expression of aopB and very important for the expression of virB and virE. However, it was responsible only for the responsiveness of katA and, to a limited extent, the vir genes to acidic pH. ChvG appears to play a role in katA expression by repressing katA at neutral pH. ChvG had no effect on the expression of two genes that were not acid-inducible. Because ChvG regulates unlinked acid-inducible genes encoding different functions in different ways, we hypothesize that ChvG is a global sensor protein that can directly or indirectly sense extracellular acidity. We also analyzed the re-sequenced chvG and found that ChvG is more homologous to its Sinorhizobium meliloti counterpart ExoS than was previously thought. Full-length ChvG is conserved in members of the α-proteobacteria, whereas only the C-terminal kinase domain is conserved in other bacteria. Sensing acidity appears to enable Agrobacterium to coordinate its coping with the environment of wounded plants to cause tumors.
Source Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/99838
ISSN: 00278424
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.192439499
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