Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.246801
Title: Strain-engineered surface transport in Si(001): Complete isolation of the surface state via tensile strain
Authors: Zhou, M.
Liu, Z.
Wang, Z.
Bai, Z.
Feng, Y. 
Lagally, M.G.
Liu, F.
Issue Date: 9-Dec-2013
Citation: Zhou, M., Liu, Z., Wang, Z., Bai, Z., Feng, Y., Lagally, M.G., Liu, F. (2013-12-09). Strain-engineered surface transport in Si(001): Complete isolation of the surface state via tensile strain. Physical Review Letters 111 (24) : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.246801
Abstract: By combining density functional theory, nonequilibrium Green's function formulism and effective-Hamiltonian approaches, we demonstrate strain-engineered surface transport in Si(001), with the complete isolation of the Si surface states from the bulk bands. Our results show that sufficient tensile strain can effectively remove the overlap between the surface valence state and the bulk valence band, because of the drastically different deformation potentials. Isolation of the surface valence state is possible with a tensile strain of ∼1.5%, a value that is accessible experimentally. Quantum transport simulations of a chemical sensing device based on strained Si(001) surface confirm the dominating surface conductance, giving rise to an enhanced molecular sensitivity. Our results show promise for using strain engineering to further our ability to manipulate surface states for quantum information processing and surface state-based devices. © 2013 American Physical Society.
Source Title: Physical Review Letters
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/98032
ISSN: 00319007
DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.246801
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