Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1021/cg9000494
Title: Engineering molecular self-assembled fibrillar networks by ultrasound
Authors: Wang, R.-Y.
Liu, X.-Y. 
Li, J.-L. 
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2009
Citation: Wang, R.-Y., Liu, X.-Y., Li, J.-L. (2009-07-01). Engineering molecular self-assembled fibrillar networks by ultrasound. Crystal Growth and Design 9 (7) : 3286-3291. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1021/cg9000494
Abstract: The architecture of self-organized three-dimensionally interconnected nanocrystal fibrillar networks has been achieved by ultrasound from a solution consisting of separate spherulites. The ultrasound stimulated structural transformation is correlated to the striking ultrasonic effects on turning nongelled solutions or weak gels into strong gels instantly, with enhancement of the storage modulus up to 3 magnitudes and up to 4 times more gelling capability. The basic principle involved in the ultrasound-induced structural transformation is established on the basis of the nucleation-and-growth model of a fiber network formation, and the mechanism of seeding multiplication, aggregation suppressing, and fiber distribution and growth promotion is proposed. This novel technique enables us to produce self-supporting gel functional materials possessing significantly modified macroscopic properties, from materials previously thus far considered to be "useless", without the use of chemical stimuli. Moreover, it provides a general strategy for the engineering of self-organized fiber network architectures, and we are consequently able to achieve the supramolecular functional materials with controllable macroscopic properties. © 2009 American Chemical Society.
Source Title: Crystal Growth and Design
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/96459
ISSN: 15287483
DOI: 10.1021/cg9000494
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