Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00767-09
Title: Isolation and characterization of "Dehalococcoides" sp. strain MB, which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to trans-1,2-dichloroethene
Authors: Cheng, D. 
He, J. 
Issue Date: Sep-2009
Source: Cheng, D., He, J. (2009-09). Isolation and characterization of "Dehalococcoides" sp. strain MB, which dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to trans-1,2-dichloroethene. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 75 (18) : 5910-5918. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00767-09
Abstract: In an attempt to understand the microorganisms involved in the generation of trans-1,2-dichloroethene (trans-DCE), pure-culture " Dehalococcoides" sp. strain MB was isolated from environmental sediments. In contrast to currently known tetrachloroethene (PCE)- or trichloroethene (TCE)-dechlorinating pure cultures, which generate cis-DCE as the predominant product, Dehalococcoides sp. strain MB reductively dechlorinates PCE to trans-DCE and cis-DCE at a ratio of 7.3 (±0.4):1. It utilizes H 2 as the sole electron donor and PCE or TCE as the electron acceptor during anaerobic respiration. Strain MB is a disc-shaped, nonmotile bacterium. Under an atomic force microscope, the cells appear singly or in pairs and are 1.0 μm in diameter and ∼150 nm in depth. The purity was confirmed by culture-based approaches and 16S rRNA gene-based analysis and was corroborated further by putative reductive dehalogenase (RDase) gene-based, quantitative real-time PCR. Although strain MB shares 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence identity with Dehalococcoides ethenogenes strain 195, these two strains possess different dechlorinating pathways. Microarray analysis revealed that 10 putative RDase genes present in strain 195 were also detected in strain MB. Successful cultivation of strain MB indicates that the biotic process could contribute significantly to the generation of trans-DCE in chloroethenecontaminated sites. It also enhances our understanding of the evolution of this unusual microbial group, Dehalococcoides species. Copyright © 2009, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Source Title: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/87541
ISSN: 00992240
DOI: 10.1128/AEM.00767-09
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