Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/10934520600867581
Title: Constructed tropical wetlands with integrated submergent-emergent plants for sustainable water quality management
Authors: Tanaka, N.
Jinadasa, K.B.S.N.
Werellagama, D.R.I.B.
Mowjood, M.I.M.
Ng, W.J. 
Keywords: Constructed wetlands
Hydrilla verticillata
Integrated emergent-submergent plant system
Nutrients
Scirpus grossus
Wastewater
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2006
Citation: Tanaka, N., Jinadasa, K.B.S.N., Werellagama, D.R.I.B., Mowjood, M.I.M., Ng, W.J. (2006-10-01). Constructed tropical wetlands with integrated submergent-emergent plants for sustainable water quality management. Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering 41 (10) : 2221-2236. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/10934520600867581
Abstract: Improvement of primary effluent quality by using an integrated system of emergent plants (Scirpus grossus in the leading subsurface flow arrangement) and submergent plants (Hydrilla verticillata in a subsequent channel) was investigated. The primary effluent was drawn from a septic tank treating domestic sewage from a student dormitory at the University of Peradeniya, Sri Lanka. Influent and effluent samples were collected once every 2 weeks from May 2004 through July 2005 and analyzed to determine water quality parameters. Both the emergent and submergent plants were harvested at predetermined intervals. The results suggested that harvesting prolonged the usefulness of the system and the generation of a renewable biomass with potential economic value. The mean overall pollutant removal efficiencies of the integrated emergent and submergent plant system were biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 65.7%; chemical oxygen demand (COD), 40.8%; ammonium (NH4 +-N), 74.8%; nitrate (NO3 --N), 38.8%; phosphate (PO4 3-), 61.2%; total suspended solids (TSS), 65.8%; and fecal coliforms, 94.8%. The submergent plant subsystem improved removal of nutrients that survived the emergent subsystem operated at low hydraulic retention times. The significant improvement in effluent quality following treatment by the submergent plant system indicates the value of incorporating such plants in wetland systems. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Source Title: Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/87475
ISSN: 10934529
DOI: 10.1080/10934520600867581
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

13
checked on Jun 16, 2018

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

14
checked on May 29, 2018

Page view(s)

41
checked on May 11, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.