Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physleta.2007.09.067
Title: Using 3D fluid-structure interaction model to analyse the biomechanical properties of erythrocyte
Authors: Chee, C.Y.
Lee, H.P. 
Lu, C.
Keywords: Cells biomechanics
Computational fluid-structure interaction
Issue Date: 25-Feb-2008
Citation: Chee, C.Y., Lee, H.P., Lu, C. (2008-02-25). Using 3D fluid-structure interaction model to analyse the biomechanical properties of erythrocyte. Physics Letters, Section A: General, Atomic and Solid State Physics 372 (9) : 1357-1362. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physleta.2007.09.067
Abstract: This Letter presents a newly developed three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model of the red blood cell (RBC). The model consists of a deformable liquid capsule modelled as Newtonian fluid enclosed by a hyperelastic membrane with viscoelastic property. Numerical results show that viscosity in the cytoplasm affects the deformed shape of RBC under loading. This observation is contrary to the earlier belief that viscosity of the cytoplasm can be neglected. Numerical simulations carried out to investigate large deformation induced on the RBC model using direct tensile forces show significant improvement in terms of correlation with experimental results. The membrane shear modulus estimated from the model ranges between 3.7 to 9.0   μN m-1 compares well with results obtained from micropipette aspiration experiments. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Physics Letters, Section A: General, Atomic and Solid State Physics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/85820
ISSN: 03759601
DOI: 10.1016/j.physleta.2007.09.067
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