Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1177/0885328213486527
Title: Development of nanofibrous cellulose acetate/gelatin skin substitutes for variety wound treatment applications
Authors: Vatankhah, E.
Prabhakaran, M.P. 
Jin, G.
Mobarakeh, L.G.
Ramakrishna, S. 
Keywords: Adherency
electrospun scaffold
gelatin
skin substitute
wound dressing
Issue Date: Feb-2014
Source: Vatankhah, E., Prabhakaran, M.P., Jin, G., Mobarakeh, L.G., Ramakrishna, S. (2014-02). Development of nanofibrous cellulose acetate/gelatin skin substitutes for variety wound treatment applications. Journal of Biomaterials Applications 28 (6) : 909-921. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1177/0885328213486527
Abstract: The major component of fibrous extracellular matrix of dermis is composed of a complex combination of proteins and polysaccharides. Electrospun cellulose acetate/gelatin might be an effective simulator of the structure and composition of native skin and during this study, we electrospun cellulose acetate/gelatin membranes in various compositions and their performance as a scaffold for either skin tissue engineering or as a wound dressing was evaluated. Skin treatment products, whether tissue-engineered scaffolds or wound dressings, should be sufficiently hydrophilic to allow for gas and fluid exchange and absorb excess exudates while controlling the fluid loss. However, a wound dressing should be easily removable without causing tissue damage and a tissue-engineered scaffold should be able to adhere to the wound, and support cell proliferation during skin regeneration. We showed that these distinct adherency features are feasible just by changing the composition of cellulose acetate and gelatin in composite cellulose acetate/gelatin scaffolds. High proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts on electrospun cellulose acetate/gelatin 25:75 confirmed the capability of cellulose acetate/gelatin 25:75 nanofibers as a tissue-engineered scaffold, while the electrospun cellulose acetate/gelatin 75:25 can be a potential low-adherent wound dressing. © 2013 The Author(s).
Source Title: Journal of Biomaterials Applications
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/84998
ISSN: 08853282
DOI: 10.1177/0885328213486527
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