Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1109/LED.2005.859673
Title: Evidence of two distinct degradation mechanisms from temperature dependence of negative bias stressing of the ultrathin gate p-MOSFET
Authors: Ang, D.S.
Wang, S.
Ling, C.H. 
Keywords: Activation energy
Arrhenius equation
Hole trapping
Negative-bias temperature instability (NBTI)
Oxynitride
Tunneling
Issue Date: Dec-2005
Source: Ang, D.S., Wang, S., Ling, C.H. (2005-12). Evidence of two distinct degradation mechanisms from temperature dependence of negative bias stressing of the ultrathin gate p-MOSFET. IEEE Electron Device Letters 26 (12) : 906-908. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1109/LED.2005.859673
Abstract: A detailed investigation of the negative-bias temperature instability (NBTI) of the ultrathin nitrided gate p-MOSFET over a wide temperature range reveals two different activation energies, indicating the coexistence of two distinct degradation mechanisms. One mechanism is linked to the incorporation of nitrogen while the other is the classical mechanism responsible for the degradation of conventional SiO2 gate devices. Eliminating the contribution of the former consistently yields an Arrhenius plot that matches excellently with that obtained through direct measurement of SiO2 gate devices. This finding shows that heavy nitridation or, in the extreme case, the adoption of Si3N4/SiOx gate stack does not change the nature of the classical NBTI mechanism but introduces a new degradation mechanism of an order-of-magnitude lower activation energy, which dominates over typical operating temperature range. This new mechanism is related to the spontaneous trapping of positive charges at nitrogen-related precursor sites near the Si-SiO2 interface. © 2005 IEEE.
Source Title: IEEE Electron Device Letters
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/82307
ISSN: 07413106
DOI: 10.1109/LED.2005.859673
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